Children's Health Archives - Active Healthcare

Six Best and Worst Foods for Asthmatics


Asthma is a challenging, but very treatable illness. There Read more

Music to Our Lungs: How Making Music Can Help Asthma


Music is a wonderful stress release for many people. Read more

Albuterol to the Rescue


Rescue inhalers are a great comfort to anyone with Read more

Does Back to School Mean Back to Allergies?


Summer is coming to a close for students in Read more

Budget Your Calories for a Bountiful Thanksgiving

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , ,

budget your caloriesThe year has flown by and Thanksgiving is only a few weeks away. For many, this holiday means overindulgence. For diabetics, it can be a very difficult time for many reasons. The hardest is resisting temptations. Who doesn’t love seconds or even thirds of their favorite dishes; i.e., mashed potatoes? An important thing to remember is “everything in moderation.” Here are a few tips to budget your calories and manage your blood sugar while still enjoying this wonderful time with family.

Stay on Schedule – Never Miss a Meal or Dose of Insulin

Set reminders on your smartphone for:

  • Meals and snacks to avoid a blood sugar dip
  • Blood sugar testing
  • Insulin doses

 

Budget Your Calories: Indulge in Sweets and Treats in Moderation

You can indulge in a few treats, but make sure to budget for those calories. Work treats into your existing carbohydrate budget instead of adding to it. Stick with proteins, vegetables and salad at dinner. Pick your favorite carb or treat and enjoy it with your calorie budget for the day.

Enjoy Alcohol in Moderation

Never drink on an empty stomach, as this lowers your blood sugar. Research nutrition information in advance for your favorite libations to make good choices. It is recommended that women with diabetes have no more than one drink per day and no more than two per day for men. The serving sizes vary depending on the type of drink.

One serving is:

  • 4 ounces of wine
  • 12 ounces of beer
  • 1 ounce of distilled spirits

 

Download Mobile Apps

Look for apps that help you count carbs for your favorite dishes, as well as how much insulin you need to take before meals.

Look for Lighter Menu Options When Eating Out

Choose dishes with less saturated fat, limit fried foods and sugars. Ask about substitutions. Most restaurants can accommodate your requests. Swap out butter with olive oil. Enjoy a baked or boiled potato in lieu of mashed potatoes or French fries.

If Asked to Bring a Dish, Cook a Light and Healthy One

This can put you at ease knowing that you can enjoy what you’ve prepared and takes out the guesswork of whether or not it is within your calorie budget.

Tips for Holiday Parties

Scan the table and look for vegetable-based options first, followed by meat or cheese. Use a napkin instead of a plate to keep your portions in check. Don’t socialize in front of the food table. Stay hydrated. Keeping water or a club soda in hand will also keep you and your hands full so you are less likely to overindulge.

Stay Active

Make it a priority to stick with your regular fitness routine while you are away from home. The holidays are generally the busiest time of the year for many people. You can break up your activity into 10-15 minute segments if it is not possible to get 30 minutes all at once.

Remember that there is a lot more to Thanksgiving and the holiday season than food. Focus on spending quality time with family and friends. Enjoy what you do eat and relax.


Six Best and Worst Foods for Asthmatics

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , ,

fruitAsthma is a challenging, but very treatable illness. There are many medications and tools available to help relieve symptoms. Did you know that asthma prevention can start in your kitchen? Not all foods are created equal. What foods might be best for asthmatics? There are even healthy foods that may worsen your asthma symptoms.

Foods That May Improve Asthma Symptoms and Support Your Respiratory System

1. Apples – these contain flavonoids such as khellin, which has been shown to open the airways.
2. Cantaloupe – these are rich in Vitamin C, which we already know is good for our immune system. This vitamin aids in clearing out congestion in the airways.
3. Carrots – these contain beta-carotene, which is an antioxidant that is converted to Vitamin A. This vitamin can reduce the possibility of exercise-induced asthma.
4. Coffee – Coffee is a natural source of caffeine, which has been proven to improve airflow. On the other hand, caffeine (especially in high doses like that found in coffee) is not recommended for children for various reasons.
5. Flax seeds – these are rich in Omega-3s, which research has found to be beneficial to asthma. They also contain magnesium which relaxes the muscles surrounding the bronchi and airways, keeping them open.
6. Garlic – Garlic is an anti-inflammatory. Anti-inflammatories are beneficial to asthma because they reduce swelling and mucus production in the airways.

Potential Allergens and Intolerances That May Worsen Asthma

1. Eggs – Because many people already suffer from an egg allergy, the reaction when consuming eggs can be in the form of exacerbated asthma.
2. Peanuts – Another common allergen. Severe reactions can be fatal. Those with a peanut allergy can actually develop asthma.
3. Salt – Salt contributes to inflammation by causing fluid retention.
4. Shellfish – Yet another common allergen, particularly in children.
5. Wine – Studies suggest that the sulfites in wine may trigger asthma attacks. On the other hand, red wine has been found to lessen symptoms if consumed in moderation.
6. Milk – If you are lactose intolerant or have any other dairy-related allergy, consuming milk products can cause wheezing, coughing, and other respiratory problems. On the other hand, milk contains Vitamin D, which can ease symptoms.

We hope that this information has given you some food for thought. Ask your doctor if dietary changes could be included as a part of your asthma management plan. He or she may also be able to test you for food-related allergies that might be exacerbating your symptoms.

Additional Resources

Read our blog on How to Manage Food Allergies During the Holidays

Check out the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America’s great online resource for kids with food allergies.


Insulin Pump vs. Multiple Injection: The Choice is Yours

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , ,

insulin pump versus multiple daily injectionsTreating diabetes can be a very time consuming, day-after-day process, but today’s diabetic has a plethora of different treatment options available — more than ever before.

Type 1 diabetics can choose between an insulin pump or administering multiple daily injections (MDI) for their insulin delivery. If you are not on a pump currently, you probably aren’t aware of just how helpful these devices can be.  Below are some advantages of both methods.

Advantages of an Insulin Pump

  • Insulin delivery is continuous, which helps prevent sudden highs and lows in blood sugar levels
  • Blood sugar control is more accurate
  • Patients need fewer needle sticks
  • Patients have more flexibility
  • Dosage can be adjusted easily according to the patient’s activity level: i.e. while exercising or sleeping

Advantages of Multiple Injections

  • Injections require less training and education
  • MDI is less expensive
  • Easier to use
  • Not always connected to the body

What Does Research Show? Insulin Pump Versus Multiple Daily Injections

Recent studies suggest that insulin pump therapy may be slightly more effective than MDI when the patients received similar, proper training.  However, both methods have been proven to reduce HbA1c levels.  An insulin pump can improve quality of life in diabetics and allow them to be a little more carefree than those that use the MDI method.  The bottom line is to find the method that fits best in your life while keeping your HbA1c levels in check.

Many of the patients of Active Healthcare are benefiting from pump therapy.  We work with manufacturers to get the right pump for our patients, as well as carry all of the necessary supplies.

Please visit our Diabetes Management page for more information on how we can help you, as well as talk to your doctor to see if they think a pump is the right method for you.


Music to Our Lungs: How Making Music Can Help Asthma

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , , ,

Music is a wonderful stress release for many people. For some, the release comes from listening to the music and relating to the lyrics. It strikes a chord inside of us all. For others, making music is the release. Whether you play an instrument or sing, you are successfully dissolving the stress of your day-to-day. Congratulations! You have found an outlet.

You might think that asthma would make this more difficult and less enjoyable. Good news! You can still make music and be symptom free. Playing a wind instrument can actually make the asthmatic more aware of his/her breathing, as well as improve their posture. They feel calmer and more in control, which will make it less likely that they will suffer from an asthma attack.

Many children make music their extracurricular activity and/or attend music class during their regular school day. If your child is interested in music as a hobby, but suffers from asthma, there is hope. Talk to his/her doctor for tips on how they can manage this while participating in music class, band, orchestra, or chorus.

If your child is interested in band or orchestra

Certain instruments are better than others at helping asthma sufferers both with their symptoms and stress levels. Some good ones are:

  • Drums — gives the musician a great cardio workout
  • Strings — increases finger dexterity and motor skills
  • Trumpet — requires copious amounts of fast, high-pressure air
  • Trombone — requires a lot of free-flowing air
  • Flute — requires the most air out of all wind instruments
  • Oboe — the reed creates high levels of pressure, causing the player to carefully control their breathing

 

For children who like to hear the sound of their own voice

Chorus may be the better option. Asthmatic vocalists benefit from the controlled, deep breathing that singing requires.  Trained singers know that breathing from their diaphragm is the only way to go, which keeps them from feeling breathless.

Music instructors will assist you with controlling your breathing in such a way that you are not even thinking about your asthma while making music.  If you are performing and feel your chest tighten (a familiar sensation for those suffering with asthma), pull out your inhaler in between songs to regroup.

Remember to share any concerns with your doctor.  They can work with you to adjust your treatment to incorporate any new hobbies or activities.  Music can help the asthmatic patient manage their stress better, which, in turn, can help them manage their asthma better.

 


Can Diabetes Give You The Blues?

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , , ,

diabetes depressionThe number of Americans that suffer from depression, also known as Major Depressive Disorder is increasing all the time. Depression is more than being sad or in a bad mood. This condition is a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Unfortunately, depression often goes undiagnosed and, therefore, untreated. As it turns out, diabetics are especially vulnerable to this condition.

Diabetics At Double the Risk of Depression

Several studies have found that diabetics are at double the risk of suffering from depression due to the physical and emotional stress of their chronic disease. A depressed diabetic is more likely to neglect his/her diet or medication plan, which is critical to their well-being. The cause is unclear, however if a patient’s depression is stress induced, a diabetic may be a greater risk because of a metabolic imbalance that already exists.

Managing a chronic condition like diabetes can be overwhelming, leaving less time and energy for dealing with life’s other challenges. The financial burden of treating diabetes may also be a contributing factor to higher rates of depression. The rising medical costs of their life sustaining treatment adds another burden.

Studies also suggest that diabetics who have a history of depression are at a higher risk of developing diabetic complications than those without. This is because depressed individuals have elevated levels of stress hormones such as cortisol, which can affect blood sugar metabolism and increase insulin resistance.

What to Watch for: Symptoms of Depression

People suffering from depression may not want to get out of bed in the morning. They neglect their diet and don’t exercise. Depressed people shun social gatherings and have trouble staying motivated at work or school.

Seek help if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms:

• Difficulty concentrating, forgetfulness and poor decision making
• Feelings of guilt, worthlessness and/or helplessness
• Insomnia or excessive sleep
• Irritability or restlessness
• Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed
• Overeating or not eating enough (dangerous for diabetics)
• Aches and pains including headaches, cramps, and digestive problems
• Persistent sadness, anxiety, and feelings of emptiness
• Thoughts of suicide or attempting suicide

Depression can be brought on by a number of factors including genetics, life circumstances, trauma, side effects of medication, stress, or other environmental factors. It is treatable with psychotherapy, as well as medication. As with most medications, anti-depressants (often called SSRIs, which stands for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor) come with side effects including nausea, weight gain, fatigue, insomnia, dry mouth, dizziness, irritability, and anxiety.

You may have chalked your feelings of sadness up to the fact that you’re diabetic when you may also be depressed. Depression should be treated as a separate condition. Getting treatment for it can help you take better care of your diabetes, putting you in optimal health.

Additional Resources:

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/mental-health/depression.html

https://www.childrensdiabetesfoundation.org/diabetes-and-depression/


Albuterol to the Rescue

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health Leave a comment   , , , , ,

Rescue inhalers are a great comfort to anyone with asthma since the onset of symptoms can be sudden and frightening. Since 2004, Federal law allows children to carry rescue medication for emergencies at school.What happens when a child forgets their inhaler at home? New federal legislation may help address this concern.

School-Based Respiratory Health Management Act | House Resolution 2285

School Rescue MedicationFederal Bill House Resolution 2285 was introduced in the House of Representatives earlier this year. If passed, this bill would allow trained school personnel to administer rescue medications.

Eleven states already allow the most common rescue medication, albuterol, to be stocked at their schools. This medication can be administered by school nurses and other trained staff during a breathing emergency.

Unfortunately, North Carolina does not allow schools to supply albuterol. In most states, a child with asthma who forgets their rescue medication may be at increased risk of complications. The states with existing laws and guidelines to stock albuterol in schools include: Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, and West Virginia.

The American Lung Association has developed a model policy for school districts. Schools can use this tool to create and implement rescue medication policies for their facility.

Wonder How Your State Ranks for Asthma and Allergy School Policies?

The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAF) releases a yearly state honor roll. This report card rates each state’s asthma and allergy policies. States are ranked in a number of categories. Ranking categories include Medication and Treatment policies, Awareness policies, and School Environment policies.

The 2016 state honor roll list includes North Carolina. Our state met 19 out of the 23 AAF core policy standards. There are, of course, areas for improvement. The AAF suggested that North Carolina add more full-time school nurses and provide additional training for school staff in asthma awareness. North Carolina can also improve their facility design standards to promote healthy school environments.

Additional Resources:

House Resolution 2285 – School-Based Respiratory Health Management Act

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America – 2016 State Honor Roll

2014 EPI Pen Legislation


Monitoring Your Diabetes at School

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes Leave a comment   , , , , ,

Type 1 Diabetes requires continuous monitoring, regardless of the patient’s environment. In previous blogs, we’ve discussed carrying an emergency bag and other methods for managing your diabetes when away from home. However, one area we did not discuss is what to do at school.

Monitoring Diabetes at School - Communication is Key

Monitoring Diabetes at SchoolFirst and foremost, you cannot communicate enough with school staff including teachers, bus drivers, and health personnel about your child’s condition. Provide as much information as possible so they will know how to assist your child when the need arises.

A Diabetes Medical Management Plan (DMMP) should be completed and gone over with school administrators so everyone is on the same page. An example of this can be downloaded here.

This comprehensive and critical document should contain the following information:

  • Blood sugar target and testing times
  • Insulin schedule
  • List of supplies
  • Meal and snack plan
  • What aspects your child can handle on their own vs. what they might need help with
  • How to handle a low blood sugar or high blood sugar episode

ADA and IDEA

There are many laws that protect your diabetic child including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). IDEA is a law that provides services to diabetic students. For more information about IDEA, click here. In addition, in a public school setting (or a private one that receives funding from the federal government), you are entitled to set up a Section 504 plan for your child.

This would require that the school make special accommodations for him or her including the following:

  • Allowing him or her to use the restroom and use the water fountain when they need to
  • Eating wherever and whenever necessary
  • Allowing extra absences
  • Scheduling exams at a time that will not cause your child to suffer from the hypo or hyperglycemia
  • Ensuring that a trained diabetes care personnel member be present during sports, extracurricular activities, and field trips

If your child is not currently using a Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) (more on this in our previous blog “The 411 on CGM”) or an insulin pump, the beginning of school is a great time to look into these options, as these devices provide peace of mind for the parent, school staff member, and child alike.


Does Back to School Mean Back to Allergies?

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , ,

Summer is coming to a close for students in North Carolina.  The change of seasons and environment can spell trouble for asthma and allergy sufferers.  They already know their at-home triggers and how to combat them, but have less control over their environment at school.  Common classroom triggers include pollen, dust mites, mold, chalk dust, and pet dander.  With the help of school administrators and parents, students can remain focused on their studies and less on their allergies.

Allergy and Asthma Preventative Measures for Back to School

  • Keep windows closed when pollen counts are high
  • Repair leaking water pipes and faucets
  • Install high efficiency air filters
  • If the classroom has a pet, position asthmatic and allergic students far away from it. In addition to the dander produced by the class pet, it is possible that a fellow student might also transport pet dander into the classroom from home.
  • Address any concerns that aren’t resolved by your administrators with county school officials, if necessary

 

Prepare for a Successful and Allergy-Free School Year

  • Make an appointment with an allergist
  • Make an appointment with your child’s teacher and/or school administrator and, if possible, perform a walk-through of the classroom to pinpoint potential triggers (this could be done at meet-the-teacher night, as well)
  • Share your child’s treatment plan with school staff and bus drivers
  • Discuss what to do in an emergency
  • Provide the school nurse with any medications the student needs, as well as the dosage and instructions
  • Also, have your child’s doctor complete your school district’s Medication Authorization form

 

Don’t Forget About Recess and Sports Activities in Your Planning

  • Use a short-acting inhaler 15 minutes before any activity, under your healthcare provider’s recommendations
  • Stay hydrated
  • Choose activities that are less intense
  • If it’s cold out, bundle up
  • Protect your eyes and lungs with a mask or bandanna

 

Going back to school is an exciting time and can be made less stressful for asthma and allergy sufferers by taking this advice into careful consideration.

 


Diabetic Tips: Making Sure It’s “In the Bag”

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , ,

Emergency Diabetes BagAs a diabetic patient or parent, you are well aware that you need an emergency diabetes bag. This is one project that can’t be put off.

Advance planning is key to successful management of your diabetes. Don’t “live and learn,” coming up with a Plan B on the fly.

Here are some ideas for filling your emergency diabetes bag

Your Medical History and Contacts List

Take the necessary time to gather this information, which should include your health conditions, allergies, medications and dosages. Also, include contact information for your doctor, pharmacy, and emergency contact. Carry one in your wallet and smartphone.  Don’t forget to store a copy in an easy-to-locate area of your home, such as attached to the fridge.

Glucose tablets or gels are great to have in your bag in the event of a blood sugar nosedive.

But don’t forget a glucagon injection kit, you may need this depending on the severity of your episode. On that note, it would also be a good idea to keep a list of signs and symptoms at work and home so others can identify these and know how to assist.

Extra Medications – Include three days’ worth of your medications.

When you are ready to head out, keep your insulin cold with reusable frozen gel packs.

Snacks to keep blood sugar stable.

Always have some non-perishable snacks such as nuts, seeds, dried fruit, whole-grain crackers, trail mix, or dry cereal on hand.

Testing Supplies – so you can test as many times as you need to.

Being out and about can raise your stress level, causing your blood sugar to fluctuate more than usual. Therefore, it may be necessary to test a little more frequently.

Include the following:

  • Meter
  • Test Strips
  • Batteries
  • Lancing Device
  • Lancets
  • Needles
  • Alcohol Swabs
  • Hand Sanitizer

Let a Medical Alert Bracelet Speak For You When You Can’t

Always remember to wear a Diabetes ID bracelet. In the event you lose consciousness or cannot speak, bystanders and first responders will know that you are diabetic and can help accordingly. This bracelet should clearly state your diagnosis and any other key health information. You can find these at the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) website at www.shopdiabetes.org.

Advanced Planning is the Key to Peace of Mind

Once you have your emergency bag packed, you can relax while on-the-go. For additional peace of mind, consider using a Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) system or an insulin pump if you are not already benefiting from one of these devices.

More information about how CGM works can be found in our previous blog The 411 on CGM.


Pump, Don’t Fail Me Now!

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , ,

Diabetes Blood Glucose TestingHave you thought about what you would do if your insulin pump were to fail? It is important to have a plan in place for when and if this occurs. You can create a fail-safe plan for the rare event of a pump failure by following these four steps.

Pump Failure Action Plan

Step 1

First and foremost, call your pump manufacturer. Your pump’s warranty will cover repairs. The manufacturer may be able to troubleshoot the pump, arrange for repairs, or even a replacement.

Step 2

Next, call your endocrinologist. He/she can help you create a plan to manage your blood sugars in the interim and what warning signs to watch for.

Step 3

Keep the following items with you at all times, making sure all are within the prescription limits and not expired:

  • long-acting insulin (in case you will be without a pump overnight)
  • short-acting insulin (to inject and repeat for bolus and/or correction)
  • ketone strips
  • a list of 24-hour pharmacies

Step 4

Also, keep a record of your pump’s settings, as you may need to program a replacement or loaner pump. On this record, include the following:

  • Total basal
  • Your basal setting, which determines how much insulin you receive each hour
  • Insulin to Carbohydrates (I:C) ratio to help with adjusting pre-meal bolus insulin doses
  • Insulin Sensitivity Factor (ISF) — the number of points one unit of rapid acting insulin lowers your blood glucose
  • Insulin On Board (IOB) – the calculation telling you how much insulin is still in your body from previous bolus doses

The possibility of a pump failure may give you chills, but remember not to panic. With the help of your manufacturer and endocrinologist, you can be well equipped to deal with this unlikely event. Before you know it, you’ll be pumping again.


The Double Threat of Vaping

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , ,

Food industry workers at a microwave popcorn factory were the first to get sick from inhaling the vapors from artificial flavorings. The vapors caused symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath, similar to those of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Popcorn: Tasty Snack; Popcorn Lung: Deadly Disease

Dubbed popcorn lung, this condition (bronchiolitis obliterans) is a serious and irreversible lung disease. The culprit is the chemical diacetyl. When inhaled, it scars the tiny air sacs in the lungs resulting in the thickening and narrowing of one’s airways.

While many major popcorn manufacturers have removed this chemical from their manufacturing process, it still poses a threat. Diacetyl is also an ingredient in the flavorings for e-cigarettes. A Harvard study found that 39 of 51 e-cigarette brands contained the offending ingredient.

With flavors like ‘Cinnatoast Munch,’ ‘Cotton Candy,’ and ‘Kiwi Watermelon,’ teens are drawn to vaping. Not only do teens think vaping looks cool; they justify their new habit by saying it is better than smoking. Some e-cigarette ‘juices’ do not contain nicotine, but there is still a danger from the artificial flavorings.

As we discussed in our March blog vaping is often a method people choose for quitting tobacco, but can be very harmful to asthmatics. Vaping is not safe. Why put yourself at risk to develop ‘popcorn lung’? Don’t forget about the many other chemicals in e-cigarette vapor, like formaldehyde.

If you are a current smoker who desires to quit, there are better and healthier ways to accomplish this. A lot of people have trouble quitting because of an oral fixation. Below are some ideas to use as a substitute for smoking or vaping.

• Chew gum (some even contain nicotine) or eat hard candies.
• Get more exercise as this can reduce stress – which may lead smokers to crave a cigarette.
• Consider the nicotine patch which can curb your urge to smoke or vape.

The American Lung Association has many resources to help you quit smoking – or vaping.

Final Notes

Diacetyl has since been removed from the following brands of microwave popcorn: Orville Redenbacher, Act II, Pop Secret, and Jolly Time. So, don’t worry. Your favorite snack is safe now.

The FDA is closely monitoring this market and has begun to apply and enforce key provisions of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. This 2009 law gives the FDA authority to regulate the tobacco market and minimize the negative impacts of smoking on America’s youth and families.

Resources

2016 Surgeon General Report detailing the use of e-cigarettes among youth and young adults.

Quitline NC:  1-800-QUIT-NOW or En Espanol at 1-855-Dejelo-Ya


The Lowdown on Stress and Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , ,

sleep deprived manIf you have diabetes, stress can take a larger toll on your body.  When the body is under stress, it acts as if it is under attack.  Cortisol (the stress hormone) levels rise, causing your body to store energy in the form of glucose and fat.  In diabetics, this process can be disrupted.  The glucose is released, and if it can’t be stored, it builds up in your bloodstream.

Stress hormones are scientifically proven to affect blood glucose levels.  Scientists who have been studying the effects of stress on these levels have found that when diabetic mice were under stress they had elevated glucose levels.  In Type 1 diabetics, studies produced mixed results with some patients experiencing a rise in blood glucose while others noticed a decline.  Type 2 diabetics more consistently experienced a rise than a decline.  This research confirms the importance of stress reduction.

Not All Coping Mechanisms Are Good

Everyone has different ways of coping with stress on the outside.  Some negative examples are below:

  • Drinking more alcohol
  • Not getting enough exercise
  • Neglecting nutrition (very important NOT to do if you’re diabetic)
  • Not getting adequate sleep

 

Diabetics have even more to think about during stressful times and stress may cause them to forget important tasks such as checking their blood glucose levels on a regular basis or planning their meals ahead of time.

Positive Coping Mechanisms

On the other hand, there are many positive ways to deal with stress.  Below are some methods anyone can implement to reduce stress:

  • Get regular exercise
  • Spend more time on your hobbies or learn a new one
  • Perform volunteer work in your community
  • When commuting, take the less stressful route to work if your drive is long
  • Patch up conflicts with your friends or family

 

Relaxation Therapy Techniques for Stress Reduction

  • Breathing exercises
  • Replace negative thoughts with positive ones
  • Progressive muscle relaxation therapy — an example of this is shown in the video below

 


EpiPen® Recall Announced by Mylan N.V.

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health Leave a comment   , ,

EpiPen Recall - 2017Meridian Medical Technologies, a Pfizer company and Mylan’s manufacturing partner, has expanded a voluntary recall of select lots of EpiPen (epinephrine injection, USP) and EpiPen Jr® (epinephrine injection, USP) Auto-Injectors to now include additional lots distributed in the U.S. and other markets in consultation with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Lots Effected by Recall

The recall impacts certain lots of the 0.3 mg and 0.15 mg strengths of EpiPen Auto-Injector. None of the recalled lots include the authorized generic for EpiPen Auto-Injector, which is also manufactured by Meridian Medical Technologies.

The manufacturer will be replacing the recalled devices at no cost.

Please visit Mylan’s website to read the Press Release with a list of the impacted lots that were sold in the United States and additional information on how to return effected devices.


Vaping is Smoking, Too

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health Leave a comment   , ,

It’s no secret that tobacco is one of the most common asthma triggers. Tobacco smoke irritates the airways and causes your lungs to produce more mucus. In addition, it weakens the tiny hairs called cilia that sweep away mucus and other irritants that settle in your airways.

Quitting smoking is an excellent method of combating asthma, but you aren’t out of the woods yet. Another important risk factor to consider is secondhand smoke. It is especially harmful for children. If you are an asthmatic, tell your family and friends how tobacco smoke affects you. Have them smoke outside and far away from the doorway, if possible. Encourage them to quit for their own health, not just yours.

Vaping is Not Risk Free

Since it is common knowledge that tobacco smoke is very bad for one’s health, many nicotine addicts turn to electronic cigarettes and “vaping.” It gives many a false sense of security and the mindset of “at least I’m not smoking actual cigarettes.” Vaping is harmful, too, but in a different way. The vapor released by e-cigarettes contains formaldehyde, another asthma trigger. So, while people are on the right track with quitting tobacco, they need to know that vaping is not risk-free and may worsen their asthma symptoms. Vaping is a developing trend among teens because there are a number of flavors offered, some even tasting like candy and adult beverages.

Another thing to avoid is secondhand vapor. Since electronic cigarettes are a relatively new phenomenon, many businesses and workplaces do not have policies in place to keep employees and patrons from “vaping” indoors. In the same way you would tell your family and friends not to smoke around you, you should also ask them to vape elsewhere.

E-Cigarettes Pose Similar Risks

A recent National Jewish Health study links the liquid in e-cigarettes to an increase in respiratory infections. During the study, a test was performed on young, healthy non-smokers and it discovered that e-cigarette use damaged the cells in the airways that defend against harmful inhalants, such as viruses. “The cells showed a strong pro-inflammatory response within minutes and the risk of viral infection in those cells rose significantly,” said Hong Wei Chu, MD, who led the study.

If you are an asthmatic or have one in your life, remember to avoid both smoking and vaping for a healthier future.


When Valentine’s Day is Bittersweet

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health Leave a comment   , , ,

Valentine's candy heartsMost people are aware of the most common asthma triggers which are referred to as the 3 Ps: pets, pollen, and pollution. Recent studies have brought a new one to light – sugar. The reason? Sugar causes inflammation of the airways. I bet you didn’t know that a little sugar could cause such a reaction.

In 2008, Dr. Sonja Kiersten, a researcher from the Nestle Institute in Lausanne, Switzerland, began to make this discovery. Dr. Kiersten and her colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania used mice to perform their research by feeding them sugar water. This experiment produced the following results.

  • The mice’s airways became inflamed, which made them more prone to developing asthma.
  • The mice fed the sugar water had airways that were twice as reactive as those that drank plain water.
  • The mice became addicted to the sugar water and wanted more.

Limiting your sugar intake is beneficial to everyone, as sugar can affect your body in a variety of ways including:

  • It can lead to an over-active pancreas, which can cause inflammation in various parts of the body. The pancreas is a small organ, so it can only take so much before it starts releasing hormones that affect your sugar levels.  It also produces insulin.  When you feed it with refined sugar like that in a can of soda, for example, your pancreas goes into overdrive and produces too much insulin. This will, in turn, inflame air passages.
  • Excess sugar leads to weight gain. Obesity aggravates asthma, as it does with many other chronic illnesses.

In addition to sugar, dairy can also worsen an asthmatic’s symptoms.  Many doctors tell their asthma patients to try to eliminate dairy from their diets because of the mucus milk and cheese produce, which clogs the airways and constricts air passages.  Even coffee can be harmful.  It is definitely important for asthmatics to stay hydrated and water is the best way for them to do so.

With Valentine’s Day approaching, here are some ideas on how you and your family can celebrate this popular holiday with minimal impact:

  • Have your child take Valentines to school with small toys attached instead (ex: a balloon).
  • Do a Valentine’s Day craft.
  • Make a special, heart-shaped breakfast using cookie cutters.
  • Take him/her out on a “date” not involving food such as a movie, walk, game night, etc.


Five Flu Myths Debunked Just in Time for Flu Season

Lisa Feierstein Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Men's Health, Women's Health 1 , ,

January is the height of flu season, and if you haven’t been vaccinated, it’s not too late to do so.

Influenza or “the flu,” as it more commonly known. This respiratory virus that can be fatal and causes severe symptoms including high fever, shaking chills, headache, body aches, cough, and tiredness.  If you haven’t ever contracted it, consider yourself lucky.

Here are five flu myths you might have heard about the flu that we will clear up for you.

Myth: You can catch the flu from the vaccine

Fact:  This is false

The vaccine contains a dead virus and cannot transmit infection. If you get sick around the time you got it, you were probably already going to get sick from exposure to the virus by an infected person.  In addition, it takes about two weeks for your body to build up the antibodies needed to fight the flu.

Myth: Vomiting and diarrhea are symptoms of Influenza.

Fact:  Influenza is strictly a respiratory illness.

Stomach flu or gastroenteritis is a completely different and separate virus. With stomach flu, you would experience vomiting and/or diarrhea in addition to stomach pain.

Myth:The vaccine is the only ammunition you need to fight the flu.

Fact:  In addition to the vaccine, you should wash your hands frequently, cough into your elbow, and drink lots of fluids.

Also, as with any illness, you will want to disinfect your surfaces such as phones, doorknobs, light switches, and remotes, as the germs can stay alive for up to 72 hours.

Myth: Young, healthy individuals cannot catch the flu.

Fact: Young and healthy individuals can catch the flu.

This group has a greater ability to fight complications of the flu, but it can still have an impact.  The 2014 flu season was particularly hard on this group of individuals.  Then, 61% of those hospitalized with influenza-like illnesses were adults aged 18-64.  In addition to reducing complications brought on by the flu, patients who are vaccinated also reduce the likelihood of transmission of the virus.

Myth: The flu vaccine causes Bell’s palsy.

Fact: No evidence has been found to support this.

One study from the Institute of Medicine reports that vaccines cause very few health problems.  “The findings should be reassuring to parents that few health problems are clearly connected to immunizations, and these effects occur relatively rarely.  The flu vaccine does not aggravate asthma, and the flu vaccine doesn’t cause Bell’s palsy,” explains Ellen Wright Clayton, MD, JD, director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society at Vanderbilt University.

Everyone, male or female, young or old, healthy or sick, will benefit from receiving a flu vaccine.  Get yours today!


Five Misconceptions About Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , ,

There are many misconceptions about diabetes. Below are a few of them followed by the truth.

Myth: People get Type 1 diabetes from eating too much sugar

Reality: No one really knows how someone gets the disease.

It does not mean that the patient eats too much sugar. “Type 1 is like being hit by lightning, and it’s not anybody’s fault,” says Steven Griffen, MD who is a vice president for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). Researchers still can’t pin down the real cause of this disease, but it means that the patient’s pancreas is not processing insulin the way that it should.

Myth: It is dangerous for people with diabetes to exercise or participate in sports

Girls Walking for Exercise

Photo from Shutterstock.

participate in sports and even thrive as an athlete. Professional athletes such as tennis star Bill Talbert, boxer Jersey Joe Walcott, and golfer Sherri Turner are all Type 1 patients.

Myth: Diabetics should avoid all sugar and carbohydrates

Reality: Diabetics can and should have some sugar and carbohydrates. 

Did you know that diabetics also experience extreme lows in their blood sugar?  Yes, it’s true.  When a diabetic has a blood sugar nosedive, this is called hypoglycemia.  The highs are referred to as hyperglycemia.  Hypoglycemia can make the patient feel just as bad as if their sugar is too high. Hypoglycemia can be avoided by a regular intake of natural sugars. Diabetics can try eating fruit and complex carbohydrates like whole grain bread and pasta to prevent hypoglycemia.

Myth: Diabetes is caused by being overweight

Reality: There are two very different types of diabetes.

Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that never goes away. Type 2 symptoms can diminish with weight management and dietary changes.  Being overweight puts you at risk for Type 2 diabetes, but Type 1 patients often find it difficult to gain weight.

Myth: Diabetes is easy to control.

Diabetes Blood Glucose TestingReality: Diabetes is hard to control, no matter how diligent one is with sticking to his/her meal plan and treatment schedule.

Treatment is ongoing. People often assume that the patient “has it all figured out.”  Stress, hormone changes, growth spurts, and illnesses can all cause a diabetic’s blood sugar to swing.

On the upside, there are so many more ways to combat Type 1 diabetes now than ever before. Patients now have many options available to them to make life with Type 1 diabetes more manageable including insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors, and even an artificial pancreas.


It’s Beginning to Look A Lot Like Asthma Season

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   ,

The holidays may be the most wonderful time of the year, but not so much for asthma sufferers. While in the midst of the flurry of activity the season brings, it can be hard for asthmatics to enjoy themselves, especially when away from home.

Here are some things that you can do to make your holiday travel and festivities more enjoyable!

Before Your Trip

airplane

First, if you know you are going to be traveling anywhere this holiday season, make an appointment as soon as possible with your doctor. This will give you the opportunity to update medications, obtain new prescriptions, and get necessary information you need for your specific asthma case to help you in your travels.

  • Ask your doctor to provide you with a copy of your personal medical records to carry with you.
  • Refill as many prescriptions as you can that you think you could potentially use up while away from home a few days before your trip.

Packing Tips

car

  • When packing your bags, remember there are some critical things to leave out of your checked baggage such as your inhaler and medical record.
  • For your remaining medications, use a re-sealable plastic bag with all of the prescription labels visible so that you can move quickly through the security checkpoint at the airport.
  • Packing a pillowcase (and a pillow and mattress pad if you have the space) from home will help eliminate the possibility of inhaling dander from the pillowcases at your destination that could bring on an attack.
  • Tell a fellow traveler that you have asthma and how they can help you if you begin to have an attack. Make sure they know where to find your inhaler in your carry-on.

 

At Your Destination

  • If you will be staying in a hotel, be sure to request a non-smoking room. Look for pet-free hotels.
  • Before you go, search for the nearest emergency room or urgent care to your destination.


Asthma and Obesity: The Chicken or the Egg?

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health Leave a comment   ,

eggsOver the last two decades, asthma and obesity have reached epidemic proportions. Obesity is a common comorbidity to asthma and it is commonly thought that obesity precedes the asthma symptoms. Now, the question has been raised about whether it is the other way around. Does obesity follow on the heels of asthma or is it asthma that raises the likelihood of becoming overweight?

Understanding this relationship could help doctors better give their professional recommendations in obese versus non-obese asthmatic patients.For instance, not automatically stepping up controller medication in overweight patients who report needing to use rescue medication often. Additionally, it may be that obese patients may be able to step down their level of controller medication. Their symptoms may respond better with non-asthma related interventions.

Recent Research Highlights the Asthma Obesity Connection

In a recent study, aged 10-17 years children – both a higher and lower body mass index (BMI) – with a physician’s diagnosis of persistent asthma were monitored to assess asthma control, symptoms, and quality of life. The patients underwent methacholine challenge testing – a test to evaluate lung function and reactivity. Additionally, the patients experienced measurement of exhaled nitric oxide values – a test done to help evaluate whether their asthma (and inflammation) is under control.

Intriguingly, overweight children were less responsive to the methacholine challenge test. They required nearly four times the dose of methacholine before the lungs were responsive. Overweight children also had lower nitric oxide values, meaning inflammation in the lungs were still a problem.

However, there were no differences in regard to reported wheeze, chest tightness, or nocturnal symptoms between overweight and lean children. These findings are a distinction from previous research, which has mostly focused wheeze as a symptom most commonly associated with just obese children.

This study’s findings support exploring non-asthma related interventions before raising levels of controller medications in overweight asthma patients. These results also support the plan that overweight asthmatic patients may need different treatment plans to control their asthma appropriately.

Whether it is the reduced lung capacity and activity level due to asthma that causes obesity, or excess weight that induces the development of asthma, it is clear that these two issues have a linked relationship. However, further research into differences in obese patients with asthma will be needed to best assess optimal therapy and prevention.


Puppies Reduce a Child’s Risk for Asthma

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health 1 , ,

puppies

The benefits of having a canine companion to come home to are numerous. New research states that lowering a child’s asthma risk is yet another reason to add to that list. Having a dog has been shown to reduce a child’s risk for asthma. It can also reduce levels of stress and depression, increase one’s physical shape, and enhance social skills.

A recent Swedish asthma study included more than one million children. Those with dogs in the home within the infant’s first year of life had a 15% lower rate of asthma.

Researchers say that their findings indicate that having a dog in the house may affect their child’s microbiome. Each individual’s inner bacterial environment of the gut is influenced by the food we consume and the air we breathe. Examinations are being made into whether there is a specific strain of bacteria that lessens the likelihood of asthma that is transmitted from dog to child.

Pets like Puppies = More time Outdoors

It is also worth noting that children living in households with dogs almost certainly spend more time outdoors and exercising more frequently. Both of these factors lower a child’s probability of developing asthma.

Interestingly enough, researchers have also explored data relating to children who grew up on farms. These children were exposed to farm animals such as cows, sheep, or horses. Findings show that these farm children had a 25% lower risk for an asthma diagnosis than those who did not grow up on a farm.

While these discoveries are not enough to definitively prove that puppies prevent asthma, they absolutely suggest that it isn’t necessary to rehome family pets for fear of their children developing respiratory problems by being around dogs.

Tove Fall, a coordinator of the study and assistant professor at Uppsala University in Sweden, stated, “It might be due to a single factor or more likely, a combination of several factors related to dog ownership lifestyle or dog owner’s attitudes, such as kids’ exposure to household dirt and pet dust, time spent outdoors or being physically active.”

All I’m hearing is a scientific reason for parents to give in and give their children a puppy!


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