allergies Archives - Active Healthcare

Time To Rake the Leaves – Fall Allergy Season

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ Leave a comment   , , , ,

Many of you may think that the springtime is the worst season for allergy sufferers. Everyone has different triggers, so the fall can also be troublesome for those with allergies and asthma. During the fall we enjoy beautiful scenery as the leaves change from green to brilliant shades of red, yellow and orange. As the season progresses, all those colorful leaves fall, becoming an allergy trigger of their own.

Fall Allergy Triggers: Pollen and Mold Spores

Although each allergy sufferer has different triggers, many people are allergic to plants that produce pollen in the fall season, such as ragweed. Another common fall allergen is mold spores. Remember all those beautiful fall leaves? Once they fall and linger on your lawn they get rained on – creating a perfect environment for the growth of mold spores.

Fall Leaves

When you rake all those leaves into a big pile – maybe for the neighborhood kids to jump into or to compost or bag up for pickup, all those mold spores are released back into the air.

Once exposed, your body reacts to the triggers and you’ll likely have a runny or stuffy nose, itchy or watery eyes and an irritated nose and throat. Doesn’t that sound like fun!

Outdoor Yardwork Tips: Protect Yourself Before and After

Since you can’t escape the yard work, if you suffer from allergies you can take these steps to minimize your symptoms this fall.

  • Wear a filter mask, especially when raking leaves
  • Rake often giving less time for mold spores to develop
  • Choose long sleeves and wear gloves to minimize exposure to your skin
  • Avoid touching your nose and eyes during yardwork
  • Choose early morning and evening times for yardwork when pollen counts are lowest

Once your yardwork is complete remember to leave your shoes at the door and change your clothing to limit tracking allergens into your home. Shower as soon as possible as allergens will linger on your skin and hair.

Even if you are not doing yardwork, just going outside can trigger an allergy attack. Remember it is best to stay inside when you hear one of your neighbors firing up their leaf blowers!

Allergy Medications Can Help

You can also work with your healthcare provider to choose the best over the counter and/or prescription medications to manage your seasonal symptoms. Some medications need to be taken in advance of the season for maximum effect. Consider adding nasal saline irrigation on a regular basis during the fall months to clear mucous and allergens from your system.

Additional Resources:

House Plants and Allergens

Holiday Planning For Those With Asthma and Allergies

Climate Changes and Outdoor Allergies


Asthma Sufferers – Plan for Fun at the NC State Fair

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ Leave a comment   , ,

Are you excited about the North Carolina State Fair?

Here are some pointers to help you enjoy all the fair has to offer, even if you have asthma.

October is Not Too Early for Flu Shots

The flu causes inflammation and narrowing of your airways which can in turn trigger an asthma flare-up.

People with asthma should always get their yearly flu shot to both avoid catching the flu and suffering its complications that can trigger asthma attacks.

Sheep and Rabbits and Ponies Oh My!

State FairOne of the favorite kid friendly attractions at the fair is the petting zoo. Take the proper steps to protect yourself when visiting all of the adorable baby animals. Close contact with animals can trigger an asthma attack because you may come in contact with proteins that are found in animal saliva, skin flakes, urine and feces.

Animal fur collects pollen, mold and other outdoor allergens that can be another trigger of your asthma symptoms. Remind your family members to wash their hands after visiting the petting zoo. Do not touch your eyes or any part of your face until you wash your hands!

Navigating Fair Food: Be Aware of Food Allergies

Each year the food vendors at the North Carolina State Fair come up with new and existing food offerings. In 2017 a few of the special treats on the menu were Deep Fried Key Lime Bites, Flamin’ Hot Cheetos Corn on the Cob, and the Blue Hawaii Funnel Cake. If you are unsure about what you are ordering, ask for an ingredients list. Those with severe food allergies may want to skip the fair food altogether and pack their own snacks. Always remember to keep food allergy medication on hand.

Watch for Exposure to Second Hand Smoke

Big crowds at outdoor venues can mean increased exposure to second hand smoke. If you are exposed to second hand smoke it is best to try to remove yourself from the area. Smoke will irate your airways and can cause them to swell and narrow. Secondhand smoke is harmful to children and adults with asthma and is a common trigger.

Travel with an extra inhaler and asthma medications. Everyone can enjoy their day out at the fair when they are prepared to manage asthma flare-ups.

Now that you’re prepared, what are you looking forward to seeing at the fair this year? Share this post with family and friends.

Additional Resources:

North Carolina State Fair Website
Best and Worst Foods for Asthmatics
Five Flu Myths Debunked


Asthma Protection During Hurricane Season

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ Leave a comment   , , , , , ,

Are You Prepared for Hurricane Season?

With June 1st being the beginning of hurricane season, what’s a better time to discuss how to protect yourself and your family from asthma triggers after a hurricane or tropical storm? Hurricanes produce high winds which blow pollen and mold spores into the air that can make asthma symptoms worse. During these times people with asthma can experience wheezing, coughing, tightness in the chest, and other complications with breathing. Here are a few tips to help prevent asthma attacks during the upcoming hurricane season.

hurricane season

Avoid Homes or Buildings with Suspected Mold Damage

Once any flooding clears and the cleanup process begins people with asthma are at risk of exposure to mold and dust. In extreme cases it is best to not even enter a building or home that has mold growth that you can see or smell. But if you have to be exposed to these conditions, protect yourself by wearing a filtering mask, rubber gloves, and eye protection.

Coping with Stress and Emotion

During the aftermath of a hurricane, stress levels are high and they can trigger an attack. That’s why it is best to take care of your emotional state of mind during these stressful times. Communicate and connect with other people and seek help if needed.

Washing Hands

Keeping your hands clean can help prevent the spread of germs. In many cases catching a cold or the flu can also trigger an asthma attack. If safe water is unavailable on a temporary basis use hand sanitizer.

Stock Up on Asthma Medications

Most importantly always have your asthma medication on hand and use as prescribed or when needed to control your asthma attacks. Consider storing medication and important documents in a waterproof container.

What About Climate Change?

Climate change may play a major factor in increasing allergies and asthma triggers. Rising temperatures lead to longer allergy seasons which can make the air quality worse. A warming climate also increases ground level ozone levels. This pollutant is considered to be one of the biggest hazards to people with asthma. It causes shortness of breath, coughing, aggravates lung diseases, and increases the frequency of asthma attacks.

Additional Resources

Helpful Links – Post Hurricane – Indoor Air Quality
What Climate Change Means for Allergy Season


Exercising with Asthma: Your Lungs Will Thank You

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Men's Health, Women's Health 1 , , , , , , , , , ,

exercising with asthmaWe hear all the time from multiple sources to get more exercise.  Everyone has their reasons for not getting enough.  We all know we should do it more, but feel like we don’t have enough time or energy to do so.  If you suffer from asthma, you may fear that working out would make your symptoms worse.  Here are some of the best options for exercising with asthma

Exercising with Asthma: Best Exercises

  1. Walking – can actually improve one’s asthma symptoms if done long term and on a regular basis. It is recommended that asthma patients walk three times per week.  Remember to warm up and cool down just like with any other exercise.
  2. Yoga – allows us to control our breathing, which is beneficial for asthmatics because it can activate more areas of the lung.
  3. Biking – with the right pace, this is a great way to get your activity in and your stress level down.
  4. Golfing – the staggered activity of alternating swings with walking is great for keeping symptoms at bay, but be sure to check the pollen levels before heading out to the course.
  5. Running – keep your distance short and your pace moderate.
  6. Downhill Skiing — as long as you don’t try to tackle one of those black diamond slopes, this outdoor activity doesn’t require a lot of physical exertion, as the mountain does most of the work.
  7. Swimming – provided the pool doesn’t contain too much chlorine, the highly humidified, warm air breathed in while swimming can loosen mucus.

Exercising with Asthma: Best Sports

  1. Baseball – allows for breaks in activity to keep symptoms in check. Take a hit on your inhaler as needed while sitting in the dugout waiting to bat.
  2. Racquet sports – the players control the pace of the game, allowing for plenty of rest and water breaks.
  3. Softball – similar to baseball, players have adequate rest to hydrate, use their inhaler, and regroup.
  4. Volleyball – A little more intense, but the court is small, so players can move quickly in short bursts.
  5. Football – while sometimes annoying to spectators, this sport allows for many breaks between downs.

Activities such as cross-country skiing, basketball, and soccer are a bit too strenuous for asthmatics.  Cross-country skiing can dry out the airways with the cold air being a contributing factor.  Basketball requires too much running up and down the court while not providing enough rest time between plays.  Soccer players are in constant motion chasing the ball unless they are a goaltender.

Exercising in a way that works for you is great way to destress, which, in turn, can help keep your asthma symptoms from flaring up.  Always remember to consult your doctor before starting a new exercise program.  Keep your water bottle and inhaler with you at all times.  And remember, exercise should also be something you enjoy.

Additional Resources for Exercising with Asthma

Check out our previous exercise-related blogs for more information:

Regular, Moderate Exercise Improves Asthma Symptoms
Don’t Wheeze Your Way Through Exercise-Induced Asthma

 


Does Back to School Mean Back to Allergies?

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , ,

Summer is coming to a close for students in North Carolina.  The change of seasons and environment can spell trouble for asthma and allergy sufferers.  They already know their at-home triggers and how to combat them, but have less control over their environment at school.  Common classroom triggers include pollen, dust mites, mold, chalk dust, and pet dander.  With the help of school administrators and parents, students can remain focused on their studies and less on their allergies.

Allergy and Asthma Preventative Measures for Back to School

  • Keep windows closed when pollen counts are high
  • Repair leaking water pipes and faucets
  • Install high efficiency air filters
  • If the classroom has a pet, position asthmatic and allergic students far away from it. In addition to the dander produced by the class pet, it is possible that a fellow student might also transport pet dander into the classroom from home.
  • Address any concerns that aren’t resolved by your administrators with county school officials, if necessary

 

Prepare for a Successful and Allergy-Free School Year

  • Make an appointment with an allergist
  • Make an appointment with your child’s teacher and/or school administrator and, if possible, perform a walk-through of the classroom to pinpoint potential triggers (this could be done at meet-the-teacher night, as well)
  • Share your child’s treatment plan with school staff and bus drivers
  • Discuss what to do in an emergency
  • Provide the school nurse with any medications the student needs, as well as the dosage and instructions
  • Also, have your child’s doctor complete your school district’s Medication Authorization form

 

Don’t Forget About Recess and Sports Activities in Your Planning

  • Use a short-acting inhaler 15 minutes before any activity, under your healthcare provider’s recommendations
  • Stay hydrated
  • Choose activities that are less intense
  • If it’s cold out, bundle up
  • Protect your eyes and lungs with a mask or bandanna

 

Going back to school is an exciting time and can be made less stressful for asthma and allergy sufferers by taking this advice into careful consideration.

 


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