asthma Archives - Active Healthcare

Music to Our Lungs: How Making Music Can Help Asthma


Music is a wonderful stress release for many people. Read more

Albuterol to the Rescue


Rescue inhalers are a great comfort to anyone with Read more

Does Back to School Mean Back to Allergies?


Summer is coming to a close for students in Read more

Got Asthma or Allergies? There’s an App for That!


AllergyManager Geared towards helping those suffering with nasal allergies by Read more

Music to Our Lungs: How Making Music Can Help Asthma

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , , ,

Music is a wonderful stress release for many people. For some, the release comes from listening to the music and relating to the lyrics. It strikes a chord inside of us all. For others, making music is the release. Whether you play an instrument or sing, you are successfully dissolving the stress of your day-to-day. Congratulations! You have found an outlet.

You might think that asthma would make this more difficult and less enjoyable. Good news! You can still make music and be symptom free. Playing a wind instrument can actually make the asthmatic more aware of his/her breathing, as well as improve their posture. They feel calmer and more in control, which will make it less likely that they will suffer from an asthma attack.

Many children make music their extracurricular activity and/or attend music class during their regular school day. If your child is interested in music as a hobby, but suffers from asthma, there is hope. Talk to his/her doctor for tips on how they can manage this while participating in music class, band, orchestra, or chorus.

If your child is interested in band or orchestra

Certain instruments are better than others at helping asthma sufferers both with their symptoms and stress levels. Some good ones are:

  • Drums — gives the musician a great cardio workout
  • Strings — increases finger dexterity and motor skills
  • Trumpet — requires copious amounts of fast, high-pressure air
  • Trombone — requires a lot of free-flowing air
  • Flute — requires the most air out of all wind instruments
  • Oboe — the reed creates high levels of pressure, causing the player to carefully control their breathing

 

For children who like to hear the sound of their own voice

Chorus may be the better option. Asthmatic vocalists benefit from the controlled, deep breathing that singing requires.  Trained singers know that breathing from their diaphragm is the only way to go, which keeps them from feeling breathless.

Music instructors will assist you with controlling your breathing in such a way that you are not even thinking about your asthma while making music.  If you are performing and feel your chest tighten (a familiar sensation for those suffering with asthma), pull out your inhaler in between songs to regroup.

Remember to share any concerns with your doctor.  They can work with you to adjust your treatment to incorporate any new hobbies or activities.  Music can help the asthmatic patient manage their stress better, which, in turn, can help them manage their asthma better.

 


Does Back to School Mean Back to Allergies?

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , ,

Summer is coming to a close for students in North Carolina.  The change of seasons and environment can spell trouble for asthma and allergy sufferers.  They already know their at-home triggers and how to combat them, but have less control over their environment at school.  Common classroom triggers include pollen, dust mites, mold, chalk dust, and pet dander.  With the help of school administrators and parents, students can remain focused on their studies and less on their allergies.

Allergy and Asthma Preventative Measures for Back to School

  • Keep windows closed when pollen counts are high
  • Repair leaking water pipes and faucets
  • Install high efficiency air filters
  • If the classroom has a pet, position asthmatic and allergic students far away from it. In addition to the dander produced by the class pet, it is possible that a fellow student might also transport pet dander into the classroom from home.
  • Address any concerns that aren’t resolved by your administrators with county school officials, if necessary

 

Prepare for a Successful and Allergy-Free School Year

  • Make an appointment with an allergist
  • Make an appointment with your child’s teacher and/or school administrator and, if possible, perform a walk-through of the classroom to pinpoint potential triggers (this could be done at meet-the-teacher night, as well)
  • Share your child’s treatment plan with school staff and bus drivers
  • Discuss what to do in an emergency
  • Provide the school nurse with any medications the student needs, as well as the dosage and instructions
  • Also, have your child’s doctor complete your school district’s Medication Authorization form

 

Don’t Forget About Recess and Sports Activities in Your Planning

  • Use a short-acting inhaler 15 minutes before any activity, under your healthcare provider’s recommendations
  • Stay hydrated
  • Choose activities that are less intense
  • If it’s cold out, bundle up
  • Protect your eyes and lungs with a mask or bandanna

 

Going back to school is an exciting time and can be made less stressful for asthma and allergy sufferers by taking this advice into careful consideration.

 


  • Have a question or comment?
     
    You can contact us via email button below or submit an online contact form

    Contact

css.php