diabetes Archives - Active Healthcare

Budget Your Calories for a Bountiful Thanksgiving

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , ,

budget your caloriesThe year has flown by and Thanksgiving is only a few weeks away. For many, this holiday means overindulgence. For diabetics, it can be a very difficult time for many reasons. The hardest is resisting temptations. Who doesn’t love seconds or even thirds of their favorite dishes; i.e., mashed potatoes? An important thing to remember is “everything in moderation.” Here are a few tips to budget your calories and manage your blood sugar while still enjoying this wonderful time with family.

Stay on Schedule – Never Miss a Meal or Dose of Insulin

Set reminders on your smartphone for:

  • Meals and snacks to avoid a blood sugar dip
  • Blood sugar testing
  • Insulin doses

 

Budget Your Calories: Indulge in Sweets and Treats in Moderation

You can indulge in a few treats, but make sure to budget for those calories. Work treats into your existing carbohydrate budget instead of adding to it. Stick with proteins, vegetables and salad at dinner. Pick your favorite carb or treat and enjoy it with your calorie budget for the day.

Enjoy Alcohol in Moderation

Never drink on an empty stomach, as this lowers your blood sugar. Research nutrition information in advance for your favorite libations to make good choices. It is recommended that women with diabetes have no more than one drink per day and no more than two per day for men. The serving sizes vary depending on the type of drink.

One serving is:

  • 4 ounces of wine
  • 12 ounces of beer
  • 1 ounce of distilled spirits

 

Download Mobile Apps

Look for apps that help you count carbs for your favorite dishes, as well as how much insulin you need to take before meals.

Look for Lighter Menu Options When Eating Out

Choose dishes with less saturated fat, limit fried foods and sugars. Ask about substitutions. Most restaurants can accommodate your requests. Swap out butter with olive oil. Enjoy a baked or boiled potato in lieu of mashed potatoes or French fries.

If Asked to Bring a Dish, Cook a Light and Healthy One

This can put you at ease knowing that you can enjoy what you’ve prepared and takes out the guesswork of whether or not it is within your calorie budget.

Tips for Holiday Parties

Scan the table and look for vegetable-based options first, followed by meat or cheese. Use a napkin instead of a plate to keep your portions in check. Don’t socialize in front of the food table. Stay hydrated. Keeping water or a club soda in hand will also keep you and your hands full so you are less likely to overindulge.

Stay Active

Make it a priority to stick with your regular fitness routine while you are away from home. The holidays are generally the busiest time of the year for many people. You can break up your activity into 10-15 minute segments if it is not possible to get 30 minutes all at once.

Remember that there is a lot more to Thanksgiving and the holiday season than food. Focus on spending quality time with family and friends. Enjoy what you do eat and relax.


Can Diabetes Give You The Blues?

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , , ,

diabetes depressionThe number of Americans that suffer from depression, also known as Major Depressive Disorder is increasing all the time. Depression is more than being sad or in a bad mood. This condition is a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Unfortunately, depression often goes undiagnosed and, therefore, untreated. As it turns out, diabetics are especially vulnerable to this condition.

Diabetics At Double the Risk of Depression

Several studies have found that diabetics are at double the risk of suffering from depression due to the physical and emotional stress of their chronic disease. A depressed diabetic is more likely to neglect his/her diet or medication plan, which is critical to their well-being. The cause is unclear, however if a patient’s depression is stress induced, a diabetic may be a greater risk because of a metabolic imbalance that already exists.

Managing a chronic condition like diabetes can be overwhelming, leaving less time and energy for dealing with life’s other challenges. The financial burden of treating diabetes may also be a contributing factor to higher rates of depression. The rising medical costs of their life sustaining treatment adds another burden.

Studies also suggest that diabetics who have a history of depression are at a higher risk of developing diabetic complications than those without. This is because depressed individuals have elevated levels of stress hormones such as cortisol, which can affect blood sugar metabolism and increase insulin resistance.

What to Watch for: Symptoms of Depression

People suffering from depression may not want to get out of bed in the morning. They neglect their diet and don’t exercise. Depressed people shun social gatherings and have trouble staying motivated at work or school.

Seek help if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms:

• Difficulty concentrating, forgetfulness and poor decision making
• Feelings of guilt, worthlessness and/or helplessness
• Insomnia or excessive sleep
• Irritability or restlessness
• Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed
• Overeating or not eating enough (dangerous for diabetics)
• Aches and pains including headaches, cramps, and digestive problems
• Persistent sadness, anxiety, and feelings of emptiness
• Thoughts of suicide or attempting suicide

Depression can be brought on by a number of factors including genetics, life circumstances, trauma, side effects of medication, stress, or other environmental factors. It is treatable with psychotherapy, as well as medication. As with most medications, anti-depressants (often called SSRIs, which stands for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor) come with side effects including nausea, weight gain, fatigue, insomnia, dry mouth, dizziness, irritability, and anxiety.

You may have chalked your feelings of sadness up to the fact that you’re diabetic when you may also be depressed. Depression should be treated as a separate condition. Getting treatment for it can help you take better care of your diabetes, putting you in optimal health.

Additional Resources:

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/mental-health/depression.html

https://www.childrensdiabetesfoundation.org/diabetes-and-depression/


Diabetic Tips: Making Sure It’s “In the Bag”

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , ,

Emergency Diabetes BagAs a diabetic patient or parent, you are well aware that you need an emergency diabetes bag. This is one project that can’t be put off.

Advance planning is key to successful management of your diabetes. Don’t “live and learn,” coming up with a Plan B on the fly.

Here are some ideas for filling your emergency diabetes bag

Your Medical History and Contacts List

Take the necessary time to gather this information, which should include your health conditions, allergies, medications and dosages. Also, include contact information for your doctor, pharmacy, and emergency contact. Carry one in your wallet and smartphone.  Don’t forget to store a copy in an easy-to-locate area of your home, such as attached to the fridge.

Glucose tablets or gels are great to have in your bag in the event of a blood sugar nosedive.

But don’t forget a glucagon injection kit, you may need this depending on the severity of your episode. On that note, it would also be a good idea to keep a list of signs and symptoms at work and home so others can identify these and know how to assist.

Extra Medications – Include three days’ worth of your medications.

When you are ready to head out, keep your insulin cold with reusable frozen gel packs.

Snacks to keep blood sugar stable.

Always have some non-perishable snacks such as nuts, seeds, dried fruit, whole-grain crackers, trail mix, or dry cereal on hand.

Testing Supplies – so you can test as many times as you need to.

Being out and about can raise your stress level, causing your blood sugar to fluctuate more than usual. Therefore, it may be necessary to test a little more frequently.

Include the following:

  • Meter
  • Test Strips
  • Batteries
  • Lancing Device
  • Lancets
  • Needles
  • Alcohol Swabs
  • Hand Sanitizer

Let a Medical Alert Bracelet Speak For You When You Can’t

Always remember to wear a Diabetes ID bracelet. In the event you lose consciousness or cannot speak, bystanders and first responders will know that you are diabetic and can help accordingly. This bracelet should clearly state your diagnosis and any other key health information. You can find these at the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) website at www.shopdiabetes.org.

Advanced Planning is the Key to Peace of Mind

Once you have your emergency bag packed, you can relax while on-the-go. For additional peace of mind, consider using a Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) system or an insulin pump if you are not already benefiting from one of these devices.

More information about how CGM works can be found in our previous blog The 411 on CGM.


  • Have a question or comment?
     
    You can contact us via email button below or submit an online contact form

    Contact

css.php