Diet Archives - Active Healthcare

Six Best and Worst Foods for Asthmatics


Asthma is a challenging, but very treatable illness. There Read more

Music to Our Lungs: How Making Music Can Help Asthma


Music is a wonderful stress release for many people. Read more

Albuterol to the Rescue


Rescue inhalers are a great comfort to anyone with Read more

Does Back to School Mean Back to Allergies?


Summer is coming to a close for students in Read more

The Sunshine Vitamin: Diabetes Edition!

Lisa Feierstein Diabetes Leave a comment   ,

The Sunshine Vitamin
The sunshine vitamin strikes again! Last month, we discussed how important vitamin D can be to reducing children’s risks for asthma. Now we will also look into how the “sunshine vitamin” could be affecting risks for diabetes. First, what exactly is vitamin D?

Not a Vitamin, but a Hormone

Vitamin D is a unique steroid hormone that influences nearly all the cells in your body. It is the only vitamin your body can create – when sunlight is absorbed in your skin. Your body creates this vitamin and turns it into a hormone. Vitamin D is important to your overall health – and low levels have been linked with many chronic diseases. Most recently, diabetes and pre-diabetes have been linked with low levels of vitamin D.

There is a distinct connection between insufficient vitamin D and insulin resistance and diabetes, both type 1 and 2. Findings in recent research indicate that a vitamin D deficiency affects your glucose metabolism. Low vitamin D may actually be more closely linked to diabetes than obesity. In one study of 118 people, it was determined that a vitamin D deficiency and obesity interact synergistically to raise the risk of diabetes and other metabolic disorders.

How Much is Enough?

Researchers also discerned that for every unit increase in vitamin D levels, the probability of progression towards diabetes in people with pre-diabetes went down by eight percent.

In another study in 2013, researchers gave type 2 diabetics 50,000 IUs of oral vitamin D3 per week for eight weeks. Study participants experienced a meaningful reduction in fasting plasma glucose and insulin. A different study with over 5,000 individuals with impaired glucose intolerance discovered vitamin D supplementation increased insulin sensitivity by 54 percent.

Animal studies have also supported that vitamin D is a foundational factor necessary for normal insulin secretion. They also found that vitamin D improves insulin sensitivity.

Optimizing levels of vitamin D among the general population could help protect against cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disease, and infertility. DNA repair and metabolic processes, migraines, mental disorders, and notably, both type 1 and 2 diabetes, could be improved as well.

As stated in our other Sunshine Vitamin post, all it takes is a few minutes in the sun to absorb some vitamin D. No need to sit in the sun for hours and raise risks for skin cancer! Additionally, supplements with vitamin D3 are also recommended – in particular if they contain vitamin K2, as it has been found to aide in the maximum absorption of vitamin D into your body.

The Sunshine Vitamin is truly invaluable support to your body’s overall health and disease prevention!


Asthma and Obesity: The Chicken or the Egg?

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health Leave a comment   ,

eggsOver the last two decades, asthma and obesity have reached epidemic proportions. Obesity is a common comorbidity to asthma and it is commonly thought that obesity precedes the asthma symptoms. Now, the question has been raised about whether it is the other way around. Does obesity follow on the heels of asthma or is it asthma that raises the likelihood of becoming overweight?

Understanding this relationship could help doctors better give their professional recommendations in obese versus non-obese asthmatic patients.For instance, not automatically stepping up controller medication in overweight patients who report needing to use rescue medication often. Additionally, it may be that obese patients may be able to step down their level of controller medication. Their symptoms may respond better with non-asthma related interventions.

Recent Research Highlights the Asthma Obesity Connection

In a recent study, aged 10-17 years children – both a higher and lower body mass index (BMI) – with a physician’s diagnosis of persistent asthma were monitored to assess asthma control, symptoms, and quality of life. The patients underwent methacholine challenge testing – a test to evaluate lung function and reactivity. Additionally, the patients experienced measurement of exhaled nitric oxide values – a test done to help evaluate whether their asthma (and inflammation) is under control.

Intriguingly, overweight children were less responsive to the methacholine challenge test. They required nearly four times the dose of methacholine before the lungs were responsive. Overweight children also had lower nitric oxide values, meaning inflammation in the lungs were still a problem.

However, there were no differences in regard to reported wheeze, chest tightness, or nocturnal symptoms between overweight and lean children. These findings are a distinction from previous research, which has mostly focused wheeze as a symptom most commonly associated with just obese children.

This study’s findings support exploring non-asthma related interventions before raising levels of controller medications in overweight asthma patients. These results also support the plan that overweight asthmatic patients may need different treatment plans to control their asthma appropriately.

Whether it is the reduced lung capacity and activity level due to asthma that causes obesity, or excess weight that induces the development of asthma, it is clear that these two issues have a linked relationship. However, further research into differences in obese patients with asthma will be needed to best assess optimal therapy and prevention.


Diabetes and the Dopey Effects of Dopamine

Lisa Feierstein Diabetes Leave a comment   , ,

dopamine levels in your brain

Have you ever wondered if there was more as to why it can be so hard to eat well? Insulin has been linked to the pleasure centers of our brain! According to a recent study, insulin has been found to be strongly allied with dopamine, a neurotransmitter that controls pleasure. This can mean a myriad of things for people with diabetes, as well as those at risk.

What is Dopamine?

First, what exactly is dopamine? It is a neurotransmitter that acts as a chemical messenger in the brain. It has many vital roles in our brain and its functions include movement, memory, attention, and most commonly known pleasure and reward seeking behavior.

At New York University Langone, researchers determined that the more insulin in the in the brain, the higher the release of dopamine. Consequently, this creates the need for us to seek out high-carb or sugary foods in order to escalate insulin levels in the brain. That in turn triggers the release of dopamine. Thus, instilling a reward system in the brain.

“Our work establishes what we believe is a new role for insulin as part of the brain’s reward system and suggests that rodents, and presumably people, may choose to consume high-carb or low-fat meals that release more insulin – all to heighten dopamine release,” said Margaret Rice, senior study investigator and neuroscientists at New York University Langone.

Low Calorie Diets = Healthy Levels of Insulin in the Brain Too

Dopamine levels were found to rise between 20 and 55 percent as a group of mice and rats ate and increased their glucose quantities. Rats who were fed a low-calorie diet only needed 10 percent of the insulin needed by rats on a normal diet to elicit an elevated release of dopamine. Essentially, this means that lowering insulin intake lowers the baseline needed to stimulate a dopamine release.

The link between higher insulin levels and diabetes makes this a dangerous discovery for those with a type 2 diagnosis. Higher carb and sugary foods increase insulin levels in the brain. This may explain why many find it difficult or near impossible to follow a healthy diet. Likewise, following an unhealthy diet means that people need more insulin to trigger the dopamine response in the brain. And so, the cycle continues.

The good news is that if these findings continue to hold, diets can be adjusted in healthy ways to manage that dopamine-reward rush! I don’t know about you, but making smart food choices and conscious decisions are much easier for me when I understand the mechanisms working behind it.


5 Natural Remedies to Aide Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Diabetes Leave a comment   ,

herbs smallI have often thought that there has to be ways to boost my body’s ability to care for itself without adding to my medicine cabinet. There has been a surge in patients seeking naturopathic doctors, as well as traditional medical doctors researching the benefits of naturopathic remedies alongside necessary prescriptions. Many clinical trials have shown that herbs can successfully assist in the treatment of various diseases such as diabetes. The traditional medical system of India, Ayurvedic medicine, finds the following herbs to help manage diabetes. It is still extremely important to maintain your relationship with your doctor and to check in before trying any herbal supplements. However, herbs can become a complimentary support to your regular treatment plan.

1. Gurmar – Translated from Hindi as the “sugar destroyer,” this is a tropical herb native to southern and central India and Sri Lanka. Its leaves have been known in India for centuries for its anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory uses. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database (NMCD) states there is developing research suggesting an extract, in combination with diabetic medications, can moderate blood sugar levels in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It is also used to facilitate weight loss.

2. Cinnamon – A familiar spice to Americans, particularly in the fall, some evidence suggests that cinnamon might help people with Type 2 diabetes. In an early study, two daily doses of cinnamon showed that it lowered fasting glucose by 18 to 29 percent, triglycerides by 23 to 30 percent, LDL cholesterol by 7 to 27 percent, and total cholesterol by 12 to 26 percent. Despite this, a few studies still yield mixed results. As it is easy to incorporate into a diet, many doctors still recommend it.

3. Fenugreek – A common addition to Indian dishes, this plant’s seeds have been cited to have an affinity for regulating insulin. It contains an amino acid known to increase the body’s production of insulin when blood sugar levels are high. In some studies of animals and humans with both diabetes and high cholesterol levels, fenugreek lowered cholesterol levels as well as blood sugar levels.

4. Shilajit – Every summer as the Himalayan mountains warm, India’s most prized herbal remedy literally oozes from resins in the mountain crevasses in the form of Shilajit. This nutrient-rich biomass has been touted for millennia by Ayurveda’s Materia Medica as the best carrier of energy and nutrition into the human body. As an endocrine tonic, shilajit supports the pancreas in insulin secretion.

5. Artemisia – Also known as “wormwood,” for women with gestational diabetes, a daily extract is associated with improved insulin sensitivity, according to a study. The researchers observed significant reductions in fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin levels, insulin resistance, and beta-cell function in the Artemisia extract group compared with the placebo group.


How to Plan for Camping with Asthma and Allergies

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ 1 , , ,
Camping: Photo by Ben Duchac, Unsplash.

Photo by Ben Duchac, Unsplash.

Camping isn’t for everyone, but I think it’s one of those time-honored American traditions that everyone should try at least once. It’s an opportunity to enjoy fresh air, hike in beautiful surroundings, and take a refreshing break from pervasive technology. Experienced campers understand the importance of packing proper gear, plenty of food and water, and making plans in case of an emergency. For individuals with asthma and allergies, it’s especially important to be well prepared before embarking on a camping trip.

If you have asthma and/or allergies, here are some tips on how to prepare for a camping trip that’s both fun and safe:

  • Update Your Asthma Management Plan: Your asthma management/action plan should be updated annually with your doctor, or more frequently if you have severe asthma. This plan will outline how to handle emergencies like an asthma attack or allergic reaction. As you pack for your camping trip, double check that you have all your medication with you.
  • Make an Emergency Plan with Travel Partners: Talk to those joining you on your camping trip about what to do in the event of an emergency—whether it is an injury, allergic reaction, or asthma attack. Share emergency contact information, familiarize yourselves with the location of the nearest hospital, and pack a first aid kit. If you have an epinephrine auto-injector to treat anaphylaxis, make sure your travel companions are familiar with how to administer the medicine in the event you should need their assistance. Epiniephrine should be kept at room temperature, so if you carry one, try to take frequent breaks in shaded areas or indoors if possible.
  • Make a Meal Plan: If you have food allergies, carry a list of foods that you’re allergic to and share that with your travel partners. Talk to your companions about how to plan for meals that don’t conflict with your list. Pack plenty of healthy, non-allergenic snacks to keep your energy up during long hikes.
  • Steer Clear of the Campfire: If you have asthma, smoke from campfires can be irritating to your airways and can even trigger an asthma attack. Sit a safe distance away from the campfire; you may have to swap seats if the wind changes and smoke blows in your direction.

A little planning will go a long way in making your camping trip not only safe but also fun and memorable.

Sources:

Camping Safe with Allergies & Asthma, by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

Epinephrine Auto-Injectors, by Food Allergy Research & Education


The 5 Best Apps for Diabetes Management

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health 1 , ,

Smartphone Apps to Track Health

Diabetes Apps AboundWith the advent of apps for smartphones, there’s something nostalgic about using a pen and paper. At meetings, I often find myself still jotting down action items in a notebook instead of in my iPad. But, when it comes to tracking my health, I’m grateful to have so many intuitive and user-friendly apps at my disposal. I can track my sleep habits, exercise and diet easily with my smartphone. There are also a number of useful health tracking apps available for individuals with specific conditions like asthma and diabetes.

Diabetes App Roundup

Here’s a roundup of some of the best diabetes apps available:

  1. Diabetes Logbook: This free app is available on the iPhone and Android platforms; Diabetes Logbook is a personalized way to track meals, blood sugar, carbs and more. The app manages to be both entertaining and educational, making users more motivated to consistently manage their diabetes.
  2. OnTrack Diabetes: A simple, intuitive design makes this app user-friendly. Available for free for Android users, OnTrack Diabetes is a way to log medication use, glucose levels, weight, exercises and more. Tables and graphs can easily be shared with doctors.
  3. Carb Counting with Lenny: This app’s colorful design and built-in mascot, Lenny the Lion, encourages children with diabetes to get in the habit of carb counting. The app also includes educational games that help boost kids’ confidence in better managing their diabetes. This app is free and available to iPhone users.
  4. Diabetik: Individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes can easily monitor meal frequency, blood glucose levels, and medication intake via interactive charts with the free iPhone Diabetik app.
  5. HealthyOut: This free app makes eating out easier by providing users with the ability to search for local restaurants that offer more diabetic-friendly meals. Users can search based on filters like “Low Carb” or Low Fat” to find healthy options while eating out.

Thanks to colorful designs, interactive charts, and user-friendly features, these apps streamline diabetes management in intuitive ways. App users can often share key data with doctors and have confidence in experiencing greater control over managing their condition.


Treating Sleep Apnea Reduces Risk of Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Diabetes Leave a comment   ,
Photo by ResMed

Photo by ResMed

Untreated sleep apnea is tied to a whole host of other health problems like an increased risk for heart disease, hypertension, stroke and diabetes. The risk goes both ways for sleep apnea and diabetes – type 2 diabetes can increase the likelihood of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but having OSA can also increase the chance of developing diabetes. Individuals with severe OSA are at a 30% higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A new study reinforced the importance of treating OSA with CPAP therapy because it can reduce the risk individuals with prediabetes face of eventually developing diabetes.

This recent study was published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, and researchers investigated the effect of using CPAP therapy for eight hours a night on the development of diabetes. Thirty-nine study participants that were middle-aged, overweight or obese with prediabetes and sleep apnea were assigned to two weeks of CPAP treatment or given a placebo.

Blood sugar control improved for participants using CPAP, they experienced lower blood pressure, and had 27% lower levels of the stress hormone norepinephrine than the placebo group. In addition to regular use of CPAP machines, OSA patients can also reduce their risk of developing diabetes by practicing healthy eating habits and through weight loss.


5 Healthy New Years Resolutions for Asthma Sufferers

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ Leave a comment   , , , ,

New Years ResolutionsIf you’re getting ready to write your New Year’s resolutions, you’re in good company—45% of Americans make New Year’s resolutions. The coming New Year is the perfect opportunity to reflect on the past year and identify areas for improvement. Most resolutions, 47% to be exact, are related to self-improvement or education—we’d all like to be a little healthier physically, relationally, and mentally. If you have asthma and are hoping for a healthier New Year, here are 5 resolutions to help guide you on your journey to better manage your asthma:

  1. Update Your Asthma Action Plan – An asthma action (or management) plan is an important first step in guiding the treatment of your asthma. Your doctor can work with you to identify what to do in situations like an asthma attack or allergy flare-up. An action plan should be updated annually with a doctor, and more frequently for individuals with severe asthma.
  2. Keep Healthy Eating and Sleeping Habits – Getting plenty of rest and eating a balanced diet will help keep your immune system healthy. Being overweight can make asthma symptoms worse, but eating plenty of fruits and vegetables that contain vitamins C and E can help control inflammation in the lungs.
  3. Quit Smoking – Smoking is one of the most common asthma triggers and can result in major health conditions like emphysema and lung cancer. Having the right support can make quitting easier, so the American Lung Association provides The Freedom From Smoking® group clinic, an eight-session, step-by-step plan to quit smoking.
  4. Exercise Regularly – There’s a long-standing myth that exercise can make asthma symptoms worse, but regular, moderate exercise can actually improve asthma symptoms. Thirty minutes of exercise a day—like walking, biking and yoga—can significantly reduce asthma symptoms. Check with your doctor to identify which medications you may need to take before and after exercising.
  5. Avoid Asthma Triggers – Common asthma triggers are tobacco smoke, mold, pet dander, pollen, and colds/upper respiratory infections. Talk to your doctor about identifying your asthma triggers and how to actively avoid them. For example, you may need special bedding if dust mites are an asthma trigger for you.

Sources:

13 New Year’s Resolutions for People with Allergies and Asthma, by Carol Proctor, Allergy & Asthma Health

Join Freedom From Smoking, American Lung Association

Can foods I eat affect my asthma symptoms? By James T.C.Li, Mayo Clinic


How to Exercise Safely with Type 1 Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Diabetes Leave a comment   ,
CCO, Pixabay

Aerobic and anaerobic exercise will have different effects on blood sugar levels.

For many of us, making the decision whether or not to go to the gym after work (or before work for you early birds!) is a daily struggle. There are so many activities vying for your time whether it’s a trip to Target, happy hour with friends, or that new season of your favorite show that was just released on Netflix. For individuals with type 1 diabetes, making it to the gym is much more than a matter of willpower. Exercising with type 1 diabetes means carefully taking into consideration blood sugar levels before, during and after exercise. Although exercise presents a unique challenge for individuals with type 1 diabetes, it improves quality of life, reduces the risk of complications related to type 1 diabetes like heart conditions, and can make it easier to control blood sugar levels. If you have type 1 diabetes, you’ve probably found that different exercises, the time of day you exercise, and what you ate before and after exercising all have an impact on how your body handles physical activity.

Since there are a lot of variables at play that can impact your blood sugar levels, begin your journey to better fitness by trying out one exercise at a time. That way, you can adjust for other variables—like food consumed and time of day—that affect how your body responds to exercise.

Ginger Vieira, author of “Dealing with Diabetes Burnout,” knows first hand the challenge of exercising with type 1 diabetes. She suggests keeping an exercise diary and writing down “the time of day, your pre-exercise blood sugar, anything you just ate, and any insulin you just took. Then write down exactly what kind of exercise you’re doing and for how long you’re doing it.” Vieira also recommends checking your blood sugar midway through the exercise and after exercising. She prefers exercising first thing in the morning before breakfast when her blood sugar is in-range and her energy is at its highest.

In addition to what you’re eating, how much insulin you’ve taken, and when you’re exercising, the type of exercise you do will also impact your body’s response. Cardiovascular or aerobic exercise, like swimming or running, uses more glucose so it tends to lower your blood sugar. You may need to eat extra carbohydrates before exercising to keep your blood sugar in a safe range. Strength training or anaerobic exercise, like weight lifting, is fueled by fat, and according to Vieira, can “increase your sensitivity to insulin later in the day while it works to repair and build those muscles.”

As you add to your exercise journal and learn what does and doesn’t work for you, remember that it’s normal to get frustrated sometimes. It’s called a workout for a reason, right? Exercising regularly is hard work, but the benefits are lasting and will boost not only your physical but also your mental health. To avoid those days when Netflix wins out over the gym, build up a support system. Workout with a friend and keep each other accountable in regard to your fitness and diet goals. If you’re schedule doesn’t mesh with your friend’s, try out a group fitness class or work with a personal trainer who can tailor a fitness plan to your needs.

Sources:

Exercise and Type 1 Diabetes, by the American Diabetes Association

5 Tips for Exercise with Type 1, by Ginger Vieira, Insulin Nation

Type 1 Diabetes and Exercise, by Daphne E. Smith-Marsh, edocrineweb


Chronic Inflammation Increases Diabetes Risk

Lisa Feierstein Diabetes Leave a comment   , , ,

When we get hurt or have an infection, the body’s natural response is to trigger inflammation. Short-term inflammation helps the body heal as white blood cells fight off bacteria and viruses. Normal inflammation manifests as pain, swelling, redness, and a sensation of heat. Chronic inflammation, on the other hand, can occur in conjunction with some diseases, like arthritis, and it can also raise the risk of developing diabetes. In these cases, inflammation continues for years and damages body tissue. Individuals suffering from chronic sleep deprivation, gum disease, poor diet or obesity are among those at risk for long-term inflammation.

Researchers have found that chronic inflammation raises the risk of developing diabetes because it interferes with insulin’s ability to regulate glucose, which can cause high blood sugar. Inflammation damages beta cells that produce insulin in the pancreas, and inflammation is also a result of the main diabetes risk factors – obesity, smoking, and diets high in fat and sugar. High-carb, low protein diets are inflammatory for many people, but low-carb diets and diets higher in fruits and vegetables have been known to reduce inflammation. In observational studies, participants on the Mediterranean diet – high in fish, whole grains, beans, nuts and vegetables – have reported low inflammatory markers.

Gum disease, air pollution and cigarette smoke, and lack of exercise are all threats that can lead to chronic inflammation. These risk factors can be reduced through good dental hygiene, the use of indoor HEPA filters and by avoiding cigarette smoke, and with regular exercise. There are also some foods, spices and teas that can help to reduce inflammation. One of my favorite anti-inflammatory foods is dark chocolate! One square of dark chocolate (at least 70% cocoa) a day can help reduce inflammation. You can also reduce inflammation by drinking a few cups of rose hip tea a day, and by adding the spice turmeric to food. If you would prefer to take a rose hip or turmeric supplement, talk to your doctor to make sure these supplements don’t conflict with any medication you’re taking. Your doctor can also test for inflammation and work with you to develop a treatment plan.


Scientists Identify Gene that could Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Diabetes Leave a comment  

The media often focuses on the rising risk of type 2 diabetes on a regular basis, and the importance of diet and exercise as ways to prevent against the disease. A new study took a different route in investigating the causes of type 2 diabetes by looking at genetic factors.

Researchers compared the genes of 81,000 individuals without type 2 diabetes and compared their genetic information to individuals with type 2 diabetes. The study found that individuals with a mutation in the gene for the glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor (GLP1R) are 14% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

The gene mutation is also linked to lower fasting glucose levels, which could also be a contributing factor in reducing the risk of diabetes for individuals with the gene mutation. For the rest of us, it’s still important to focus on the three pillars of health – sleep, diet and exercise – as the best way to prevent against type 2 diabetes.


Healthier Eating Could Reduce Asthma Symptoms

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ Leave a comment  

Eating healthy isn’t just good for your waistline, a new study shows that children with asthma can experience reduced symptoms by avoiding certain fatty foods and incorporating omega-3 fish oils to their diet. Asthma is the top reason children miss school, and obese children don’t respond as well to their asthma medicine. Dr. Jason Lang, a Pulmonary Pediatrician at Nemours Children’s Hospital, is conducting the study and hopes to extend it through May 2016. Children in the study keep a food journal and also take an omega-3 supplement, and showed notable change in their asthma management and experienced a reduction in asthma attacks.

Interested in keeping your own food journal? MyFitnessPal is free online tool and mobile app that let’s you track your meals, calorie intake, and exercise. You can also incorporate more omega-3s in your diet by eating seafood like salmon, sardines, trout, fresh tuna and halibut. Some foods are fortified or enriched with omega-3 fatty acids like eggs, milk, yogurt, bread, pasta, and walnuts.


Eat Better, Breathe Better

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ Leave a comment  

You’ve probably heard it before—fiber-rich foods are an important part of a balanced diet. There’s a reason the saying goes, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”—we all want to “stay regular.” Scientists recently discovered another reason to have a fiber-rich diet and surprisingly enough it’s related lung health.

Researchers studied mice on three different diets—low-fiber, regular chow, or food with fiber supplements—and found that the mice with a high-fiber diet had a stronger resistance to asthma-like attacks. When mice on the low-fiber diet were exposed to dust mites, a known allergen, they experienced increased airway inflammation. The high-fiber diet mice showed a lesser asthmatic response to the dust mites.

Fiber supports gut bacteria that in turn produces anti-inflammatory molecules. When these molecules enter the bloodstream, they help regulate the immune system, which is important because an over-reactive immune system negatively affects allergies and asthma. Need more fiber in your life? Try foods like nuts, apples, bulgur wheat, kiwis, and chia seeds.


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