EpiPens Archives - Active Healthcare

EpiPen® Recall Announced by Mylan N.V.


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EpiPen® Recall Announced by Mylan N.V.

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health Leave a comment   , ,

EpiPen Recall - 2017Meridian Medical Technologies, a Pfizer company and Mylan’s manufacturing partner, has expanded a voluntary recall of select lots of EpiPen (epinephrine injection, USP) and EpiPen Jr® (epinephrine injection, USP) Auto-Injectors to now include additional lots distributed in the U.S. and other markets in consultation with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Lots Effected by Recall

The recall impacts certain lots of the 0.3 mg and 0.15 mg strengths of EpiPen Auto-Injector. None of the recalled lots include the authorized generic for EpiPen Auto-Injector, which is also manufactured by Meridian Medical Technologies.

The manufacturer will be replacing the recalled devices at no cost.

Please visit Mylan’s website to read the Press Release with a list of the impacted lots that were sold in the United States and additional information on how to return effected devices.


How to Plan for Camping with Asthma and Allergies

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ 1 , , ,
Camping: Photo by Ben Duchac, Unsplash.

Photo by Ben Duchac, Unsplash.

Camping isn’t for everyone, but I think it’s one of those time-honored American traditions that everyone should try at least once. It’s an opportunity to enjoy fresh air, hike in beautiful surroundings, and take a refreshing break from pervasive technology. Experienced campers understand the importance of packing proper gear, plenty of food and water, and making plans in case of an emergency. For individuals with asthma and allergies, it’s especially important to be well prepared before embarking on a camping trip.

If you have asthma and/or allergies, here are some tips on how to prepare for a camping trip that’s both fun and safe:

  • Update Your Asthma Management Plan: Your asthma management/action plan should be updated annually with your doctor, or more frequently if you have severe asthma. This plan will outline how to handle emergencies like an asthma attack or allergic reaction. As you pack for your camping trip, double check that you have all your medication with you.
  • Make an Emergency Plan with Travel Partners: Talk to those joining you on your camping trip about what to do in the event of an emergency—whether it is an injury, allergic reaction, or asthma attack. Share emergency contact information, familiarize yourselves with the location of the nearest hospital, and pack a first aid kit. If you have an epinephrine auto-injector to treat anaphylaxis, make sure your travel companions are familiar with how to administer the medicine in the event you should need their assistance. Epiniephrine should be kept at room temperature, so if you carry one, try to take frequent breaks in shaded areas or indoors if possible.
  • Make a Meal Plan: If you have food allergies, carry a list of foods that you’re allergic to and share that with your travel partners. Talk to your companions about how to plan for meals that don’t conflict with your list. Pack plenty of healthy, non-allergenic snacks to keep your energy up during long hikes.
  • Steer Clear of the Campfire: If you have asthma, smoke from campfires can be irritating to your airways and can even trigger an asthma attack. Sit a safe distance away from the campfire; you may have to swap seats if the wind changes and smoke blows in your direction.

A little planning will go a long way in making your camping trip not only safe but also fun and memorable.

Sources:

Camping Safe with Allergies & Asthma, by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

Epinephrine Auto-Injectors, by Food Allergy Research & Education


How to Manage Food Allergies During the Holidays

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ Leave a comment   ,
The holidays are the perfect time to make traditional dishes.

The holidays are the perfect time to make traditional dishes.

I read a funny story the other day by NPR’s Marc Silver about his quest to decipher a dog-eared, stained cookbook from his late mother-in-law. He wanted to keep her memory present at holiday meals, but struggled with missing information (and sometimes misinformation) from his mother-in-law’s handwritten notes. Through trial and error, he managed to nearly re-create her popular recipes but admits, “I guess there are some ingredients only a grandmother can bring into the mix.”

The holidays are the perfect time of year to make these time-honored traditional foods that have been passed down to each generation. However, with so many different foods available at holiday parties, individuals with food allergies can feel like their work is cut out for them. Food allergies can cause life-threatening reactions and in some cases can trigger asthma symptoms. Common symptoms of food allergies can be nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and rash. If your food allergies trigger asthma symptoms, you may start coughing and wheezing, which can lead to anaphylaxis if not treated promptly. If you have a food allergy, here are some steps to take to stay safe during the holiday season:

Update Your Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Emergency Care Plan

This plan outlines symptoms and warning signs of allergic reactions. It also provides steps and visuals that explain how to help someone experiencing anaphylaxis and how to administer an epinephrine auto-injector.

Keep Medication on Hand

Make sure your epinephrine auto-injector isn’t expired, and keep one with you– especially when you’re attending a meal at a friend or family member’s home. Make sure family members are familiar with your emergency care plan so they can help you quickly in the event of an emergency.

Ask About the Menu

If possible, ask the party’s host ahead of time about the menu and let them know about your food allergies. You can also offer to bring a dish that you know is safe, or host a gathering at your home where you can more closely monitor the menu.

Prep for Travel

The Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) group has a handy checklist of how to prepare for a flight, and what to keep in mind while traveling. You’ll want to notify the airline of your food allergies, and pack your own safe snacks for traveling. Wipe down the tray table in case there’s leftover snack residue from a previous traveler, and keep your EpiPen® with you instead of in the overhead bin.

The holidays can be a challenging time for individuals with food allergies, but it’s also a time to create family traditions with new food allergy-friendly recipes. Allergic Living has an “Allergy Safe Recipes Search” where you can search for tasty meals that are food allergy-friendly. This gluten-free “Hungarian Goulash with ‘Buttery’ No Egg Noodles” recipe caught my eye! What new food allergy-friendly holiday dish will you try this year?


Allergy and Asthma Safety at Summer Camp

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health 1 ,
Photo from Shutterstock.

Photo from Shutterstock.

Camp memories last a lifetime – swimming in the lake, making crafts, having S’mores by the campfire, and making new friends. In order to keep these memories positive ones, parents should make sure children with insect or food allergies have an EpiPen (epinephrine auto-injector) available at camp. Anyone with a food allergy is at risk for anaphylaxis, and those with food allergies and asthma are at an even higher risk, which is why it’s so important to have epinephrine on hand.

Children should pack at least one EpiPen in case of an emergency, preferably two – one to keep with them at all times and one to leave with the camp nurse or a trained counselor. Campers that plan on canoeing or kayaking should pack their EpiPen in a Ziploc bag or a “dry bag” to keep it dry and secure since the epinephrine carrier tube isn’t waterproof.

Hot temperatures can reduce the effectiveness of EpiPens, but it can be hard to avoid the heat while at summer camp. Ideally, EpiPens are stored at room temperature (68-77 degrees), but they can be exposed to up to 86 degrees for short periods of time. On especially hot days, campers with EpiPens should try to find shade periodically and take breaks indoors. It’s not a good idea to use an ice pack in an attempt to keep an EpiPen cooler because extreme cold can also reduce the medicine’s effectiveness.

Campers with food or insect allergies that are exposed to these allergens should use an EpiPen immediately and go to the hospital for monitoring. It’s important to use an EpiPen right away, even if the affected individual doesn’t immediately exhibit symptoms.

Additional Resources:


Local Schools Required to Provide Students with EpiPens

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health Leave a comment  

North Carolina students with allergies have reason to feel a bit more secure this fall. Effective Nov. 1, Governor Pat McCrory signed a law requiring K-12 schools to carry epinephrine autoinjectors (EpiPens) for students. Principals are also required to select at least one person at the school to be trained annually on how to identify allergic reactions and use EpiPens.

Although the state won’t fund the purchase of EpiPens, both public and private schools can apply to take part in a free distribution program called EpiPen4Schools. The program is run through Mylan Specialties and Bioridge Pharma, and participating schools can receive up to four EpiPens a year. Teachers can also receive training on recognizing allergy symptoms through advocacy groups like the Food and Allergy Research and Education (FARE) group.

In November 2013, President Obama signed the School Access to Emergency Epinephrine Law, which provides funding incentives for states with their own epinephrine laws.


President Obama Signs New EpiPen Law to Protect Children with Asthma and Severe Allergies

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On November 13th, President Obama signed into law the School Access of Emergency Epinephrine Act, legislation that helps protect schoolchildren who experience anaphylaxis, a life -threatening allergic reaction. The new law provides funding incentive to states that enact laws allowing schools to stock and administer emergency supplies of epinephrine auto-injectors. Food allergies are prolific in the United States. The potentially life-threatening disease is a growing public health issue, and a concern among those with asthma, as allergies can trigger asthma symptoms such as coughing and wheezing. The first line of treatment for anaphylaxis, epinephrine narrows blood vessels and aids lung passages that are more susceptible to inflammation and swelling, which leads to shortness of breath, coughing and wheezing. The epinephrine auto-injector is used to deliver measured doses of epinephrine by a spring-loaded syringe.
 
The new legislation will help save lives of children who may experience an anaphylactic reaction for the first time at school or don’t have an epinephrine auto-injector available when anaphylaxis occurs. There are states which have legislation either requiring or allowing schools to stock and administer emergency supplies of epinephrine auto-injectors, North Carolina is among the 22. The state of North Carolina recently made Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America’s Honor Roll by meeting several of their core policy standards. Of the core standards met, providing emergency protocols for asthma and anaphylaxis are among many standards upheld by the state.


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