exercise Archives - Active Healthcare

7 Asthma Myths for Asthma Awareness Month

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ Leave a comment   , , , , ,

Did you know that May is Asthma Awareness month? With spring in the air it is a perfect time to test your knowledge and learn more about asthma symptoms and triggers. Check out these seven asthma myths.

Myth: All Asthma is the same

There are several types of asthma but here are the most common ones. Allergic asthma is most commonly associated with grass, mold, and dust. In cough-variant asthma the number one symptom is coughing. This commonly flairs when there is dust, cold air or a strong smell. Exercise-induced asthma is when you have a hard time catching your breath during intensive physical activity. The effects can last five to twenty minutes after working out.

Myth: People with Asthma Should Not Exercise

Physical activity is beneficial to everyone, including those with asthma. Exercise can be easier for people with asthma when it is done in places of high humidity as this helps open the airways.

Read some tips about Exercising with Asthma

Myth: Pets cause Asthma

For some people, asthma is triggered by pet allergens. The protein found in pets’ saliva, skin flakes, urine, and feces can also cause allergic reactions. Surprisingly the fur of an animal is not always an asthma trigger. Animals with fur can also be a carrier of other triggers such as dust and other allergens.

Read more about how Puppies Can Reduce A Child’s Risk for Asthma

Myth: Don’t Worry about Exposure to Secondhand Smoke

Secondhand smoke and smoke in general is not good for anyone’s health. Exposure to smoke is one of the most common asthma triggers. Smoke irritates airways and causes them to swell and narrow. Irritated airways can more easily fill with mucus making breathing more difficult.

Myth: You can Outgrow Asthma

People who have asthma when they are very young may outgrow their symptoms as their lungs develop. However, in many cases, symptoms can reoccur in adulthood following exposure to smoke or respiratory viruses.

Myth: Asthma is Contagious

Asthma is not contagious but it can run in your family. The Centers for Disease Control report that three-fifths of all asthma cases are hereditary. If one of your parents have asthma you are three to six times more likely to develop it yourself.

Myth: Asthma has a Cure

There is no cure for asthma but with the right tools and knowledge, your asthma can be managed so you can live a healthy life.

So how did you do on the quiz? See the additional links below to expand your asthma knowledge. Why not share this post with friends and family who need to learn more about this chronic disease.

Additional resources:

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America – Asthma Facts and Figures
Asthma Facts and Figures

Social Media – Asthma and Allergy Awareness Campaigns
Asthma and Allergy Awareness Campaigns


Exercise and Blood Sugar Control for Kids with Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes Leave a comment   , , , , , , , , , , , ,

There are many good reasons for anyone with diabetes to participate in a regular exercise program. But what are the important considerations about exercise and blood sugar control for kids with diabetes?

children-exercising-diabetes

Exercise can stabilize blood sugar levels and help maintain a healthy weight. Excess body fat prevents insulin from working to its full potential to control blood sugar. Another benefit of regular exercise is stress reduction and relaxation. Exercise is fun, especially when you are playing your favorite sport with your friends!

Preventing Low Blood Sugar – Hypoglycemia

Every diabetic knows the importance of planning in the successful management blood sugar. Regular blood sugar testing, or the use of a continuous glucose monitor, along with meal planning are all parts of comprehensive diabetes management plan. One consideration for active children, especially those participating in organized sports is the prevention of hypoglycemia.

Activities done for a long period of time, even at a moderate pace can cause the blood sugar levels to drop precipitously, even hours after the activity has ceased.

Keep coaches in the loop. They can assist with extra testing and have quick sugar snacks available, like fruit juices, hard candy, or honey. Coaches should know the signs of both low and high blood sugar, and keep handy instructions about what to do if either situation occurs.

Symptoms of Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia):Sweating, lightheadedness, shakiness, weakness, anxiety, hunger, headache, problems concentrating, and confusion

Symptoms of High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia):Frequent urination, fatigue, increased thirst, blurred vision, and headache

Hyperglycemia and Dehydration

When your muscles work hard they signal for the body to release extra glycogen from storage in the liver. If this excess glucose is not needed, and the amount of insulin doesn’t match the blood glucose, hyperglycemia (too much blood sugar) can result.

Shorter intense activities – like sprinting or weight lifting may actually cause a rise in blood sugar. The body sees the energy expenditure uptick and releases stored glycogen from the liver. If the activity level is not maintained, the body can’t use the excess sugar and blood sugar levels go up.

Unfortunately the body tries to remove the excess glucose through increase urination – which can contribute to dehydration. As with all athletes, children with diabetes need to stay well hydrated during any physical activity. The excitement of competition can produce extra adrenaline, which can also raise blood sugar.

Planning is the Key

Your healthcare provider may recommend a change to insulin dosing on the days when your child has practice or a game where there will be a higher level of physical activity. Tracking blood sugar levels before, during and after activity can give valuable information to your child’s healthcare provider to adjust dosing schedules.

Get to know how your child’s body reacts to different kinds of activity. To prevent the worry of blood sugar swings consider adding a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to your child’s diabetes management program. (link to 411 on CGM blog) A CGM will provide 24/7 updates on blood sugar levels and trending information.

A Lifetime of Fitness

Family Taking a WalkEveryone can appreciate the long-term benefits of fitness – improved functioning of your heart, lungs, and other vital body systems. Exercise enhances flexibility and increases muscle strength.

Even if your child does not play on a sports team you can still plan activities as a family to keep everyone moving. Ask your child to suggest activities for your family as they are much more likely to happily participate in activities that they already enjoy.

Additional Resources:

WebMD’s Safe Exercise Tip List for Children with Type 1 Diabetes

How to Exercise Safely with Type 1 Diabetes

The 411 on CGM


Cold Weather Tips for Asthma Sufferers

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ Leave a comment   , , , ,

North Carolina is typically known for its mild winters. 2018 looks to be off to a very chilly start!

People who suffer from asthma may be caught off guard when the weather forecast turns unusually cold. As with most things, preparation is the key to keeping asthma under control.

Cold Air = Increased Lung Inflammation

cold weather tips asthmaWhen you step outside and take a deep breath in cold air – it’s shocking – you feel like you can’t take a deep breath. While breathing in cold air can be uncomfortable for anyone, people who suffer from asthma need to be more cautious.

Cold air can shock the lungs of people with asthma. This shock can cause inflammation – which may lead to an asthma attack. Breathing can become more challenging since cold air also constricts airways. While those with asthma may be able to tolerate breathing in cold air for a few minutes, exercising outside could be dangerous.

Don’t forget that cold winter air is also drier, another potential airway irritant for those who suffer from asthma. Wind can also stir up more dust and other allergens.

Minimize the impact of Cold Weather

  • Consider exercising indoors. If you do exercise outdoors make sure to warm up properly.
  • Take your asthma medication 10 to 15 minutes prior to heading outside into the cold air.
  • Wear a scarf or a mask over your nose and mouth when outdoors to help warm the air entering your lungs. Mom was right, dress in layers and wear a hat!
  • On days where extremely cold temperatures are in the forecast plan to minimize the time you spend outside.

 
Remember that spending more time indoors can increase your exposure to the many indoor allergens and asthma triggers. Dampness and mold are two common indoor asthma triggers. Adding some indoor humidity can help keep nasal passages from drying out, but watch for signs of too much humidity like mold and mildew.

In general, the winter is cold and flu season. Encourage children to cover their mouths and noses when they cough or sneeze. Frequent hand washing and avoiding those who are sick can help everyone stay healthy and happy this winter.


Exercising with Asthma: Your Lungs Will Thank You

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , , , , , , , ,

exercising with asthmaWe hear all the time from multiple sources to get more exercise.  Everyone has their reasons for not getting enough.  We all know we should do it more, but feel like we don’t have enough time or energy to do so.  If you suffer from asthma, you may fear that working out would make your symptoms worse.  Here are some of the best options for exercising with asthma

Exercising with Asthma: Best Exercises

  1. Walking – can actually improve one’s asthma symptoms if done long term and on a regular basis. It is recommended that asthma patients walk three times per week.  Remember to warm up and cool down just like with any other exercise.
  2. Yoga – allows us to control our breathing, which is beneficial for asthmatics because it can activate more areas of the lung.
  3. Biking – with the right pace, this is a great way to get your activity in and your stress level down.
  4. Golfing – the staggered activity of alternating swings with walking is great for keeping symptoms at bay, but be sure to check the pollen levels before heading out to the course.
  5. Running – keep your distance short and your pace moderate.
  6. Downhill Skiing — as long as you don’t try to tackle one of those black diamond slopes, this outdoor activity doesn’t require a lot of physical exertion, as the mountain does most of the work.
  7. Swimming – provided the pool doesn’t contain too much chlorine, the highly humidified, warm air breathed in while swimming can loosen mucus.

Exercising with Asthma: Best Sports

  1. Baseball – allows for breaks in activity to keep symptoms in check. Take a hit on your inhaler as needed while sitting in the dugout waiting to bat.
  2. Racquet sports – the players control the pace of the game, allowing for plenty of rest and water breaks.
  3. Softball – similar to baseball, players have adequate rest to hydrate, use their inhaler, and regroup.
  4. Volleyball – A little more intense, but the court is small, so players can move quickly in short bursts.
  5. Football – while sometimes annoying to spectators, this sport allows for many breaks between downs.

Activities such as cross-country skiing, basketball, and soccer are a bit too strenuous for asthmatics.  Cross-country skiing can dry out the airways with the cold air being a contributing factor.  Basketball requires too much running up and down the court while not providing enough rest time between plays.  Soccer players are in constant motion chasing the ball unless they are a goaltender.

Exercising in a way that works for you is great way to destress, which, in turn, can help keep your asthma symptoms from flaring up.  Always remember to consult your doctor before starting a new exercise program.  Keep your water bottle and inhaler with you at all times.  And remember, exercise should also be something you enjoy.

Additional Resources for Exercising with Asthma

Check out our previous exercise-related blogs for more information:

Regular, Moderate Exercise Improves Asthma Symptoms
Don’t Wheeze Your Way Through Exercise-Induced Asthma

 


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