Travel Archives - Active Healthcare

EpiPen® Recall Announced by Mylan N.V.


Meridian Medical Technologies, a Pfizer company and Mylan’s manufacturing Read more

Are You Asthma Aware?


Did you know that May is Asthma Awareness Month?Spring Read more

Vaping is Smoking, Too


It’s no secret that tobacco is one of the Read more

Leaving on a Jet Plane: Traveling with Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Diabetes Leave a comment  

travel by airBelieve it or not, the upcoming travel season is upon us. If you’re diabetic and planning a trip, you may be a bit anxious about how best to manage your condition while away from home. You’re not alone.

Taking a trip will require more preparation, but can still be an enjoyable experience. Below are a few tips to help you with your trip planning:

Before You Travel: Get your documents together

  • Prescriptions from your doctor for any medications, as well as for your medical devices (CGM, insulin pump, etc.)
  • Documentation that specifies that you are a diabetic.
  • If traveling to a foreign country, make sure this document is translated to the language spoken in any of the countries on your itinerary.
  • Make a few copies of this document and distribute them to anyone traveling with you.

Packing Tips

Put medications in your carry-on bag

  1. Store medication in a quart-size plastic container or bag so that airport security can easily identify them at the checkpoint.
  2. Separate them from other liquids in your carry-on luggage.
  3. If possible, keep your insulin bottles or pens in their original packaging, as this will provide airport security staff with the prescriptions they will be asking for.
Packing Suitcase for Travel

Over pack your supplies

When packing your supplies, take twice as much as you think you will need.

Pack non-perishable snacks

Keep a few ready-to-eat snacks in your carry-on luggage for those blood sugar dips.


Additional Travel Resources

  • Visit the Transportation Safety Administration’s (TSA) website – Be sure to check out the requirements of the TSA ahead of time so you will know what to expect at the security checkpoint.
  • Look into loaner pumps – Many pump manufacturers offer loaner programs. Check with your specific pump manufacturer for details.


It’s Beginning to Look A Lot Like Asthma Season

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   ,

The holidays may be the most wonderful time of the year, but not so much for asthma sufferers. While in the midst of the flurry of activity the season brings, it can be hard for asthmatics to enjoy themselves, especially when away from home.

Here are some things that you can do to make your holiday travel and festivities more enjoyable!

Before Your Trip

airplane

First, if you know you are going to be traveling anywhere this holiday season, make an appointment as soon as possible with your doctor. This will give you the opportunity to update medications, obtain new prescriptions, and get necessary information you need for your specific asthma case to help you in your travels.

  • Ask your doctor to provide you with a copy of your personal medical records to carry with you.
  • Refill as many prescriptions as you can that you think you could potentially use up while away from home a few days before your trip.

Packing Tips

car

  • When packing your bags, remember there are some critical things to leave out of your checked baggage such as your inhaler and medical record.
  • For your remaining medications, use a re-sealable plastic bag with all of the prescription labels visible so that you can move quickly through the security checkpoint at the airport.
  • Packing a pillowcase (and a pillow and mattress pad if you have the space) from home will help eliminate the possibility of inhaling dander from the pillowcases at your destination that could bring on an attack.
  • Tell a fellow traveler that you have asthma and how they can help you if you begin to have an attack. Make sure they know where to find your inhaler in your carry-on.

 

At Your Destination

  • If you will be staying in a hotel, be sure to request a non-smoking room. Look for pet-free hotels.
  • Before you go, search for the nearest emergency room or urgent care to your destination.


How to Plan for Camping with Asthma and Allergies

Lisa Feierstein Allergies, Asthma, Breathe EZ 1 , , ,
Camping: Photo by Ben Duchac, Unsplash.

Photo by Ben Duchac, Unsplash.

Camping isn’t for everyone, but I think it’s one of those time-honored American traditions that everyone should try at least once. It’s an opportunity to enjoy fresh air, hike in beautiful surroundings, and take a refreshing break from pervasive technology. Experienced campers understand the importance of packing proper gear, plenty of food and water, and making plans in case of an emergency. For individuals with asthma and allergies, it’s especially important to be well prepared before embarking on a camping trip.

If you have asthma and/or allergies, here are some tips on how to prepare for a camping trip that’s both fun and safe:

  • Update Your Asthma Management Plan: Your asthma management/action plan should be updated annually with your doctor, or more frequently if you have severe asthma. This plan will outline how to handle emergencies like an asthma attack or allergic reaction. As you pack for your camping trip, double check that you have all your medication with you.
  • Make an Emergency Plan with Travel Partners: Talk to those joining you on your camping trip about what to do in the event of an emergency—whether it is an injury, allergic reaction, or asthma attack. Share emergency contact information, familiarize yourselves with the location of the nearest hospital, and pack a first aid kit. If you have an epinephrine auto-injector to treat anaphylaxis, make sure your travel companions are familiar with how to administer the medicine in the event you should need their assistance. Epiniephrine should be kept at room temperature, so if you carry one, try to take frequent breaks in shaded areas or indoors if possible.
  • Make a Meal Plan: If you have food allergies, carry a list of foods that you’re allergic to and share that with your travel partners. Talk to your companions about how to plan for meals that don’t conflict with your list. Pack plenty of healthy, non-allergenic snacks to keep your energy up during long hikes.
  • Steer Clear of the Campfire: If you have asthma, smoke from campfires can be irritating to your airways and can even trigger an asthma attack. Sit a safe distance away from the campfire; you may have to swap seats if the wind changes and smoke blows in your direction.

A little planning will go a long way in making your camping trip not only safe but also fun and memorable.

Sources:

Camping Safe with Allergies & Asthma, by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

Epinephrine Auto-Injectors, by Food Allergy Research & Education


What Ozone Forecast Season Means for Air Quality

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ Leave a comment   , ,
Ozone: Photo from Pexels.

Photo from Pexels.

Spring snuck up on me this year–not that I’m complaining! It doesn’t seem that long ago that the news was monopolized by winter weather warnings and threats of snowstorms. I’m more than happy to put those snow boots away and slip into my favorite summer sandals! The advent of warmer weather also means we’re heading into ozone forecast season which is when ground-level ozone, created by pollution from sources like cars and smokestacks, is at its highest.

High amounts of ground-level ozone can worsen asthma symptoms, so it’s key for asthmatics to check the forecast daily, which is posted to our Asthma Therapy page. Ozone forecast season stretches from April 1 to October 31 in North Carolina and serves as a reminder to check the forecast before heading outdoors.

Ozone Levels and Air Quality Forecasts

The forecast is color coded to indicate air quality and the potential health implications:

  • Good: Code Green
  • Moderate: Code Yellow – Dangerous to those with extreme asthma
  • Unhealthy For Sensitive Groups: Code Orange
  • Unhealthy For Most Everyone:Code Red
  • Very Unhealthy: Code Purple – The whole population is at risk; this is an emergency condition.

 

The air quality forecast is published each day at 3pm to help you plan your outdoor activities for the following day. In addition to accessing the forecast on our website, you can also sign up for email, phone, or mobile app alerts via the Environmental Protection Agency’s AirNow website.

Ozone forecast season isn’t just a reminder to monitor air quality; it can also inspire us to take steps to improving air quality. Cleaner air means fewer high ozone days, healthier lungs, and more opportunities to enjoy the outdoors. One step you can take to improve air quality is to choose sustainable transportation for your daily commute to work. Rethink your commute by carpooling, vanpooling, biking to work, working from home, or taking the bus. Many local transit agencies offer financial incentives for switching over to a sustainable mode of transportation – like GoTriangle’s GoSmart program. Choosing alternative transportation can also help you save money on gas and vehicle maintenance. It’s been several years since our last code red ozone day and I hope this ozone forecast season proves to be a healthy and safe one!


Traveling with Asthma: Part 1

activeadmin Asthma Leave a comment  

It’s summer vacation time, but before you’re able to hit the road, there’s the dreaded chore of packing. Next to your sunscreen, flip-flops and stylish sunglasses, don’t forget to pack your asthma medication. Smart packing and a little research on your destination will go a long way in making your trip smooth and enjoyable.

Make a Packing List

Taking your medication with you is especially important if you’re in a foreign country. Brand names of drugs are sometimes different in other countries and it could be tricky to communicate with a doctor who speaks a foreign language; it’s best to avoid any issues by taking your medication with you. Pack spares of your medication so you have a backup in the event of lost medication.

If you’re traveling by plane, check with the airline about any packing constraints. Check packing guidelines from the Transportation Security Administration (855-787-2227), and visit the “Special Travel Needs” section on the airline’s website. Leave your medication in the original container and in your carry-on for easy access; if you’re checked baggage gets lost, you’ll be glad your medication is in your carry-on luggage. Some airlines even make oxygen available to passengers, so ask before your flight if that’s an option.

Research your Destination

Check the weather for your destination, and look for information about pollution levels at online new sites. That way, you can prepare for the type of air quality you’ll encounter.

You may also need to call your insurance company to verify that you’re covered while traveling. If you plan to go abroad, you could need travel insurance. If you have a smartphone, check to see if it works internationally as it could come in handy if you need to look up a hospital.

Assess your Hotel Room

Hotel rooms can be a hot spot for cleaning and smoking fumes, and dust mites. If you’re sensitive to harsh cleaning chemicals, avoid a room near a pool where those chemicals are used. Also check that your room is in a non-smoking area. If dust mites cause you trouble, consider bringing your own bedding or ask the hotel if they use impervious mattress covers.

With a little preparation, you can avoid navigating a foreign healthcare system and have a fun, relaxing and healthy trip.


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