Type 2 Diabetes Archives - Active Healthcare

Diabetes Rates Rise Among Children and Teens

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes Leave a comment   , ,

The New England Journal of Medicine recently reported that new cases of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are on the rise in youth. Estimates indicate that in the United States, 29.1 million people live with diabetes. About 208,000 of those are younger than 20. While Type 2 diabetes has a strong correlation with excess weight, type 1 diabetes is an auto immune condition.

The study’s goal was to reveal trends in newly diagnosed cases of diabetes within various ethnic groups. Research revealed that from 2002 to 2012 the rate of new cases of type 1 diabetes in youth went up approximately 1.8 percent each year. During the same time period, the rate of new cases of type 2 diabetes went up quicker, at 4.8 percent.

Diabetes Rates Rise: Other Findings in the Report:

  • Higher Type 1 Rates in Male Participants. Across all groups, the rate of new cases of type 1 diabetes increased more annually from 2003-2012 in males (2.2 percent) than in females (1.4 percent) ages 0-19.
  • Hispanic Youth Showed Largest Increase of Type 1. Among ages 0-19, the rate of new cases of type 1 diabetes increased most in Hispanic youth, a 4.2 percent annual increase.
  • Type 2 Rates Highest Amongst Native Americans. Among ages 10-19, the rate of new cases of type 2 diabetes rose most sharply in Native Americans (8.9 percent), Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders (8.5 percent) and non-Hispanic blacks (6.3 percent).
  • White Youth Showed Smallest Type 2 Increase. The smallest upturn was seen in whites (0.6 percent).
  • Higher Type 2 Rates in Female Participants. The rate of new cases of type 2 diabetes rose more sharply in females (6.2 percent) than in males (3.7 percent) ages 10-19.

Increased Health Care Burdens and Reduced Quality of Life

Living with diabetes from a young age sets up a longer lifetime of increased health care costs. It also creates potential for diabetes related complications. Efforts are underway by organizations like the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to find ways to prevent or delay youth from developing Type 2 diabetes, which has become more common in recent years.

Since the cause of Type 1 diabetes is still unknown, more work is needed to find out possible disease triggers that leave the body unable to produce adequate insulin. This study’s insights into the varying rates of diabetes by ethnic group may lead to new research directions.

Additional Resources:

New England Journal of Medicine Incidence Trends of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes among Youths, 2002-2012

CDC National Diabetes Prevention Program

Exercise and Blood Sugar Control for Kids with Diabetes


Can Diabetes Give You The Blues?

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , , ,

diabetes depressionThe number of Americans that suffer from depression, also known as Major Depressive Disorder is increasing all the time. Depression is more than being sad or in a bad mood. This condition is a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Unfortunately, depression often goes undiagnosed and, therefore, untreated. As it turns out, diabetics are especially vulnerable to this condition.

Diabetics At Double the Risk of Depression

Several studies have found that diabetics are at double the risk of suffering from depression due to the physical and emotional stress of their chronic disease. A depressed diabetic is more likely to neglect his/her diet or medication plan, which is critical to their well-being. The cause is unclear, however if a patient’s depression is stress induced, a diabetic may be a greater risk because of a metabolic imbalance that already exists.

Managing a chronic condition like diabetes can be overwhelming, leaving less time and energy for dealing with life’s other challenges. The financial burden of treating diabetes may also be a contributing factor to higher rates of depression. The rising medical costs of their life sustaining treatment adds another burden.

Studies also suggest that diabetics who have a history of depression are at a higher risk of developing diabetic complications than those without. This is because depressed individuals have elevated levels of stress hormones such as cortisol, which can affect blood sugar metabolism and increase insulin resistance.

What to Watch for: Symptoms of Depression

People suffering from depression may not want to get out of bed in the morning. They neglect their diet and don’t exercise. Depressed people shun social gatherings and have trouble staying motivated at work or school.

Seek help if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms:

• Difficulty concentrating, forgetfulness and poor decision making
• Feelings of guilt, worthlessness and/or helplessness
• Insomnia or excessive sleep
• Irritability or restlessness
• Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed
• Overeating or not eating enough (dangerous for diabetics)
• Aches and pains including headaches, cramps, and digestive problems
• Persistent sadness, anxiety, and feelings of emptiness
• Thoughts of suicide or attempting suicide

Depression can be brought on by a number of factors including genetics, life circumstances, trauma, side effects of medication, stress, or other environmental factors. It is treatable with psychotherapy, as well as medication. As with most medications, anti-depressants (often called SSRIs, which stands for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor) come with side effects including nausea, weight gain, fatigue, insomnia, dry mouth, dizziness, irritability, and anxiety.

You may have chalked your feelings of sadness up to the fact that you’re diabetic when you may also be depressed. Depression should be treated as a separate condition. Getting treatment for it can help you take better care of your diabetes, putting you in optimal health.

Additional Resources:

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/mental-health/depression.html

https://www.childrensdiabetesfoundation.org/diabetes-and-depression/


Diabetic Tips: Making Sure It’s “In the Bag”

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , ,

Emergency Diabetes BagAs a diabetic patient or parent, you are well aware that you need an emergency diabetes bag. This is one project that can’t be put off.

Advance planning is key to successful management of your diabetes. Don’t “live and learn,” coming up with a Plan B on the fly.

Here are some ideas for filling your emergency diabetes bag

Your Medical History and Contacts List

Take the necessary time to gather this information, which should include your health conditions, allergies, medications and dosages. Also, include contact information for your doctor, pharmacy, and emergency contact. Carry one in your wallet and smartphone.  Don’t forget to store a copy in an easy-to-locate area of your home, such as attached to the fridge.

Glucose tablets or gels are great to have in your bag in the event of a blood sugar nosedive.

But don’t forget a glucagon injection kit, you may need this depending on the severity of your episode. On that note, it would also be a good idea to keep a list of signs and symptoms at work and home so others can identify these and know how to assist.

Extra Medications – Include three days’ worth of your medications.

When you are ready to head out, keep your insulin cold with reusable frozen gel packs.

Snacks to keep blood sugar stable.

Always have some non-perishable snacks such as nuts, seeds, dried fruit, whole-grain crackers, trail mix, or dry cereal on hand.

Testing Supplies – so you can test as many times as you need to.

Being out and about can raise your stress level, causing your blood sugar to fluctuate more than usual. Therefore, it may be necessary to test a little more frequently.

Include the following:

  • Meter
  • Test Strips
  • Batteries
  • Lancing Device
  • Lancets
  • Needles
  • Alcohol Swabs
  • Hand Sanitizer

Let a Medical Alert Bracelet Speak For You When You Can’t

Always remember to wear a Diabetes ID bracelet. In the event you lose consciousness or cannot speak, bystanders and first responders will know that you are diabetic and can help accordingly. This bracelet should clearly state your diagnosis and any other key health information. You can find these at the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) website at www.shopdiabetes.org.

Advanced Planning is the Key to Peace of Mind

Once you have your emergency bag packed, you can relax while on-the-go. For additional peace of mind, consider using a Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) system or an insulin pump if you are not already benefiting from one of these devices.

More information about how CGM works can be found in our previous blog The 411 on CGM.


The Lowdown on Stress and Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , ,

sleep deprived manIf you have diabetes, stress can take a larger toll on your body.  When the body is under stress, it acts as if it is under attack.  Cortisol (the stress hormone) levels rise, causing your body to store energy in the form of glucose and fat.  In diabetics, this process can be disrupted.  The glucose is released, and if it can’t be stored, it builds up in your bloodstream.

Stress hormones are scientifically proven to affect blood glucose levels.  Scientists who have been studying the effects of stress on these levels have found that when diabetic mice were under stress they had elevated glucose levels.  In Type 1 diabetics, studies produced mixed results with some patients experiencing a rise in blood glucose while others noticed a decline.  Type 2 diabetics more consistently experienced a rise than a decline.  This research confirms the importance of stress reduction.

Not All Coping Mechanisms Are Good

Everyone has different ways of coping with stress on the outside.  Some negative examples are below:

  • Drinking more alcohol
  • Not getting enough exercise
  • Neglecting nutrition (very important NOT to do if you’re diabetic)
  • Not getting adequate sleep

 

Diabetics have even more to think about during stressful times and stress may cause them to forget important tasks such as checking their blood glucose levels on a regular basis or planning their meals ahead of time.

Positive Coping Mechanisms

On the other hand, there are many positive ways to deal with stress.  Below are some methods anyone can implement to reduce stress:

  • Get regular exercise
  • Spend more time on your hobbies or learn a new one
  • Perform volunteer work in your community
  • When commuting, take the less stressful route to work if your drive is long
  • Patch up conflicts with your friends or family

 

Relaxation Therapy Techniques for Stress Reduction

  • Breathing exercises
  • Replace negative thoughts with positive ones
  • Progressive muscle relaxation therapy — an example of this is shown in the video below

 


Breastfeeding Reduces Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , ,
Breastfeeding has many benefits for both babies and mothers.

Breastfeeding has many benefits for both babies and mothers.

The decision to breastfeed or use formula is one of those polarizing parenting subjects akin to co-sleeping or hiring a nanny versus using day care. Breastfeeding can be a real challenge for busy moms, but researchers continue to find more and more examples of how breastfeeding benefits a baby’s immune system. In addition ato delivering antibodies, breastfeeding reduces a baby’s risk of asthma. Breastfed babies also have fewer ear infections, respiratory conditions, and hospitalizations. When the topic of breastfeeding comes up, the focus is often on the impact breastfeeding has on the baby. New research published in the Annals of Internal Medicine shows that breastfeeding can also greatly benefit the mother by reducing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Can Breastfeeding Reduce Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes?

The study focused on 900 women two years after they gave birth. The women in the study each had gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Breastfeeding for over two months reduced their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 50%. Study participants who both breastfed and used formula experienced a 30% reduction in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Study author Erica Gunderson, a senior research scientist at Kaiser Permanente Northern California, explains how breastfeeding allows the insulin-producing cells in the body to take a break, so to speak, because they don’t have to generate as much insulin to lower blood glucose. Breastfeeding also burns glucose and fat in the bloodstream because those nutrients are used in creating milk. Breastfeeding brings the body’s metabolism back to normalcy “after the metabolic chaos of pregnancy,” says Dr. Alison Strube, assistant professor of maternal-fetal medicine with the University of North Carolina School of Medicine – Chapel Hill.

Breastfeeding – A Healthy Choice for Mom and Baby

There are a variety of reasons why some women choose not to breastfeed—busy schedules, difficulty finding a secluded space to breastfeed in public, and because babies digest formula more slowly so bottle feedings may be less frequent. Whatever a mother’s ultimate decision, this study is encouraging in that it shows that mothers who had gestational diabetes can still benefit from a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes by using a combination of breastfeeding and formula. If you’re a new or expecting mom, talk to your doctor about the pros and cons of breastfeeding and using formula to make an informed decision about the best option for you and your baby.


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