Vitamin D Archives - Active Healthcare

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The Sunshine Vitamin: Diabetes Edition!

Lisa Feierstein Diabetes Leave a comment   ,

The Sunshine Vitamin
The sunshine vitamin strikes again! Last month, we discussed how important vitamin D can be to reducing children’s risks for asthma. Now we will also look into how the “sunshine vitamin” could be affecting risks for diabetes. First, what exactly is vitamin D?

Not a Vitamin, but a Hormone

Vitamin D is a unique steroid hormone that influences nearly all the cells in your body. It is the only vitamin your body can create – when sunlight is absorbed in your skin. Your body creates this vitamin and turns it into a hormone. Vitamin D is important to your overall health – and low levels have been linked with many chronic diseases. Most recently, diabetes and pre-diabetes have been linked with low levels of vitamin D.

There is a distinct connection between insufficient vitamin D and insulin resistance and diabetes, both type 1 and 2. Findings in recent research indicate that a vitamin D deficiency affects your glucose metabolism. Low vitamin D may actually be more closely linked to diabetes than obesity. In one study of 118 people, it was determined that a vitamin D deficiency and obesity interact synergistically to raise the risk of diabetes and other metabolic disorders.

How Much is Enough?

Researchers also discerned that for every unit increase in vitamin D levels, the probability of progression towards diabetes in people with pre-diabetes went down by eight percent.

In another study in 2013, researchers gave type 2 diabetics 50,000 IUs of oral vitamin D3 per week for eight weeks. Study participants experienced a meaningful reduction in fasting plasma glucose and insulin. A different study with over 5,000 individuals with impaired glucose intolerance discovered vitamin D supplementation increased insulin sensitivity by 54 percent.

Animal studies have also supported that vitamin D is a foundational factor necessary for normal insulin secretion. They also found that vitamin D improves insulin sensitivity.

Optimizing levels of vitamin D among the general population could help protect against cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disease, and infertility. DNA repair and metabolic processes, migraines, mental disorders, and notably, both type 1 and 2 diabetes, could be improved as well.

As stated in our other Sunshine Vitamin post, all it takes is a few minutes in the sun to absorb some vitamin D. No need to sit in the sun for hours and raise risks for skin cancer! Additionally, supplements with vitamin D3 are also recommended – in particular if they contain vitamin K2, as it has been found to aide in the maximum absorption of vitamin D into your body.

The Sunshine Vitamin is truly invaluable support to your body’s overall health and disease prevention!


The Sunshine Vitamin

Lisa Feierstein Asthma, Breathe EZ, Children's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   ,

pregnant-blog picWhat if all it took was a little sunshine to lower your baby’s risk for asthma? In a recent study, researchers have observed that women with more vitamin D in their second trimester lowered their babies’ risk for asthma.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 12 in the U.S. suffers from asthma. “Our health system spends billions and billions treating asthma, and there’s lots and lots of opportunity costs,” said David Slusky, assistant professor of economics at the University of Kansas. “Pain and suffering, loss of productivity and premature death — asthma has all of those.”

The University of Kansas has found that as little as 10 minutes a day in the sun during the second trimester of pregnancy could reduce a child’s risk for asthma later in life. Sunlight is where Americans get more than 90 percent of our vitamin D. David Slusky and colleagues Nils Wernerfelt of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Richard Zeckhauser of Harvard’s Kennedy School examined the medical hypothesis using an economist’s tools, such as survey and health data.

Looking at hospital discharges and where asthmatics were born, they were able to pinpoint times mothers would have been in their second trimesters. Concerned about the sunlight being systematically different in separate parts of the country, researchers focused on relative variations. In other words, instead of looking at sunny versus non-sunny areas, they concentrated on differences of the level of sunlight at a particular place at a particular time of year. For example, people born in Georgia in July of 1978 received a different exposure to sunlight in utero than did their fellow Georgians born a year later.
Medical literature emphasizes our need for the “sunshine vitamin” and recommends at least 10 minutes a day to us all. Of course, if you’re going to be in the sun for longer periods of time, wear sunscreen.

“Skin cancer is a very serious disease, and I don’t want to minimize it, but at some point that extra minute you spend inside is costing you more vitamin D than it’s helping you not get skin cancer,” Slusky said.

Prenatal vitamins may include vitamin D already, but medical professionals pointed out that mothers may not be absorbing the full benefit from them. Anything that can help minimize the likelihood of asthma is worth doing, especially something as pleasant as spending some time in the sun.

Besides, sunshine is free!


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