Type 1 Diabetes Archives - Active Healthcare

Using a Low Carb Diet to Help Treat Type 1 Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes Leave a comment   , , , ,

For children with type 1 diabetes, snack time isn’t always simple. Diet is an important part of a diabetes management plan to help avoid blood sugar spikes. But new research by endocrinologists at Boston Children’s Hospital suggests that food can be used as a powerful tool to help keep blood sugar under control.

low carb veggies

About the Study

Endocrinologists Dr. David Ludwig and Dr. Belinda Lennerz from Boston Children’s Hospital conducted an observational study on diabetic children who follow a very low carb diet. The children’s very low carb diets included on average only 36 grams of carbs a day.

The parents of these children were members of a Facebook group for families with diabetic children. The observational data was confirmed by the child’s doctors and analyzed using the latest techniques.

Here are just 3 possible benefits of a very low carb diet for children with diabetes.

Greater Glycemic Control

Children in the study had what the researchers called “exceptional” glycemic control. The common target range for hemoglobin A1c values are below 7%. However, children in the study had average hemoglobin A1c values at 5.67%, within the normal range for children overall.

Researchers are very excited at the prospect of diabetic children achieving normal hemoglobin A1c values with the help of diet. More research is needed to confirm the connection, but the possibility is an amazing development in the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

Less Complications

The study found that children on the very low carb diet had lower hospitalization rates than usual. Only 1% of the children were hospitalized for hypoglycemia and only 2% were hospitalized for diabetic ketoacidosis.

Boost Mental Health

High or low blood sugar is known to negatively impact mood, mental resilience, and overall brain health. For children with diabetes prone to high or low blood sugar spikes, mental health is especially important. For more information and other ways to improve mental health in your diabetic child, see our blog on mental health for teens with type 1 diabetes.

Diet can be a powerful tool in the management of type 1 diabetes.

Ask your doctor about whether a low carb or other specialized diet could be a good addition to your child’s diabetes management plan.

Resources

Very Low Carb Diet can safely curb blood sugar in type 1 diabetes, study suggests – Boston Children’s Hospital
Management of Type 1 Diabetes With a Very Low–Carbohydrate Diet (Original Research) – Pediatrics
New Recommendations from the ADA: Management of Type 1 Diabetes In Children and Adolescents
Added Sugar Amounts Now On Nutrition Facts Panel


Tips For Managing Type 1 Diabetes at School

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes Leave a comment   , , ,

Back to School 3

 

The first day of school will be here before you know it. If your child has type 1 diabetes, there should be a few extra items on your back to school checklist to make sure that your child and their school are ready for the year ahead.

Here are a few important tips for an easy adjustment back to school:

1. Make a Diabetes Management Plan

Your child’s Diabetes Management Plan is an essential tool. Work with your doctor to draft a plan containing all important information concerning your child’s diabetes care. Include all medication details, symptoms of low blood sugar, target blood sugar range, and other important details those caring for your child should know.

2. Connect with the school nurse and other staff

Provide a copy of your child’s Diabetes Management Plan to the school nurse, administration, and all of your child’s teachers, coaches, and other supervising adults. If your child’s school does not have a full time nurse, figure out which staff members are best equipped to help if the nurse is not present.

All your child’s teachers should be aware of symptoms of low blood sugar, what your child needs to do to manage their blood sugar, and what help your child will need with those steps, if any.

In addition, your child should wear a medical notification bracelet or necklace that indicates their diabetes diagnosis. This guarantees that even substitutes or other rotating staff will be aware of your child’s condition in case of an emergency.

If needed, consider creating a 504 plan. A 504 plan is an official document that details the exact responsibilities of the school and ensures that your child has the same opportunities as all other students.

3. Pack their backpack with the essentials

Make sure your child has the tools they need for diabetes management during the school day. Build a compact kit full of testing supplies, antiseptic wipes, and backup insulin, as well as glucose tablets or other fast-acting snacks for raising blood sugar.

4. Get your child involved (as age appropriate)

As your child gets older, they should take on more responsibility for their diabetes care. Depending on the age of your child, help them identify their symptoms of low blood sugar. When your child has a greater understanding and more responsibility in their own care, they will have more confidence in the face of adversity at school and beyond.

Give your child the foundation they need to succeed in the New Year

With careful preparation, you can ensure that your child gets the most out of their school days, minimizing the stress from managing their diabetes.

Additional Resources

Tips for Managing Diabetes at School from the CDC
Monitoring Diabetes at School
Diabetic Tips: Making Sure It’s in the Bag


New Type of Immune Cell Discovered in Connection to Type 1 Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Diabetes Leave a comment   , , , , , ,

immune cellFor many years, researchers have theorized that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder, where the body attacks healthy insulin producing cells in the body instead of bacteria and viruses. However, the exact reason why the autoimmune response occurs had not been discovered.

Recently, researchers at John Hopkins have discovered a new type of immune cell that may be the source of the autoimmune reaction that causes type 1 diabetes.

How the immune system works

The immune system consists of T cells and B cells, known as lymphocytes. These cells seek out, identify, and destroy antigens that are harmful for the body, including bacteria and viruses.

When an immune cell identifies an antigen, it alerts other cells to create antibodies and eliminate the threat. However, when immune cells wrongly identify a healthy cell in the body as a antigen, it triggers an autoimmune response, causing disorders including arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes.

What is the hybrid X cell?

However, groundbreaking new research has identified a different sort of hybrid immune cell with properties of both T cells and B cells. Researchers call these X cells. The dual structure of the X cells means the cells can activate both T and B cells, making them uniquely powerful actors in the immune system.

What is the connection between X cells and Type 1 Diabetes?

X cells are able to create a special protein called x-Id peptide. Scientists believe this protein mimics the signature for insulin, which wrongly identifies insulin as a dangerous antigen. Since X cells have a  hybrid structure, both T and B cells are alerted to attack insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.

Researchers compared the immune cells of both patients with and without type 1 diabetes. While both diabetic and non-diabetic patients had X cells, diabetic patients had substantially more X cells present.

In addition, only diabetic patients had X cells with the genetic code for producing the x-Id peptide. This leads scientists to believe that the production of this protein could be connected to the diabetic autoimmune response .

What are the next steps for diabetes research?

With the discovery of X-cells and the x-Id peptide, it is possible that a early detection procedure for type 1 diabetes could be developed. The genetic code for the production of the x-Id peptide in X cells could serve as a bio-marker, indicating a higher chance of developing the condition. Early detection can lead to better treatments and healthier lives for children with type 1 diabetes.

Researchers also explained that these discoveries about the possible mechanics of type 1 diabetes has pushed science closer to an eventual cure. Immunotherapy could be the new frontier of diabetes treatment.

Scientific discoveries lead to better diabetes treatment

With the effort of countless researchers, we have gained a deeper understanding of how diabetes works in the body. This greater understanding helps patients with type 1 diabetes get better care and pushes the medical field closer to a cure.

Additional Resources

Medical News Today – Could this unusual immune cell be the cause of type 1 Diabetes
The Scientist – Novel Type of Immune Cell Discovered in Type 1 Diabetes Patients
Five Misconceptions About Diabetes
5 Natural Remedies to Aide Diabetes


Mental Health for Teens with Type 1 Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes Leave a comment   ,

Research shows that diabetics are at higher risk for mood disorders and other mental illness. During the often tumultuous teenage years, it’s important for parents and caregivers of teens with diabetes to understand how diabetes and mental health interact.

Why mental health is crucial for teens with diabetes

teen mental healthAccording to the American Diabetes Association, diabetic teens tend to show 2-3 times the rate of psychological distress than their peers without diabetes.

Living with diabetes is not easy and can add to the other stress that teens experience. Stress has a negative effect on diabetes, leading to a feedback loop if both a teen’s stress and diabetes are not managed correctly.

Here are some tips for supporting the mental health of teens with diabetes.

Encourage independence

Every teenager wants to be more independent, including those with diabetes. New technology can make it easier than ever for teens to take on a larger role in their diabetes care. Cell phone apps can sync to continuous glucose monitors (see our previous blog “The 411 on CGM” for more information), allowing teens to take initiative while their parents are kept in the loop with automatic updates.

Prioritize self-care

The busy lives of teens can leave no room for personal time to recharge. Especially during stressful times like finals, encourage your teen to take short breaks. Spending a few minutes to take a walk, listen to music, or do something else enjoyable can do wonders to lower stress.

Build a foundation of self-esteem and acceptance

Insecurity can cause teens with diabetes to try and hide their condition from peers. From a young age, educate your child about diabetes and how each part of their diabetes management plan is important. This will instill self-confidence and a greater sense of self-understanding in your child.

Be aware of warning signs

Early detection of psychological distress is important, especially for teens with diabetes. If you notice your teen has lost interest in their favorite activities or has unexpectedly lost or gained weight, check in with your teen and consider getting the help of a professional if needed.

Take care of your own mental health as a caregiver

Several studies have shown that caregivers of children with diabetes have a higher likelihood of depression. While caring for your child, don’t neglect your own mental health. Try joining a local support group for parents of children with type 1 diabetes. Talking with other parents in the same situation can do wonders to boost your outlook.

Wellness of body and mind for diabetic teens is possible

The teenage years are the best time to develop good habits for both physical and mental health. For teens with diabetes, these good habits allow a smooth transition into self-sufficient diabetes management in adulthood.

Additional Resources

ADA Position Statement

JDRF (Triangle/Eastern NC ) – Support Resources for Parents of Children with Type 1 Diabetes

CDC: Diabetes & Mental Health

Teen Focus: Dangerous Duo Type 1 Diabetes and Drinking

Can Diabetes Give You The Blues?

The Lowdown on Stress and Diabetes


The Dangers of Hypoglycemia – New Educational Resources

Lisa Feierstein Diabetes Leave a comment   , , ,

One of the biggest fears of people living with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) and their caregivers is a low blood sugar event, also known as hypoglycemia. While people with T1D may not recognize the signs of dropping blood sugar, most know how dangerous it can be if left unnoticed or untreated.

What is Hypoglycemia?

  • Low blood glucose levels – outside of your target range
  • Typically less than 70 mg/DL
  • Triggers your fight/flight response due to a release of adrenaline
  • If left untreated, may lead to seizure or coma.

What is Hypoglycemia Unawareness?

Diabetes Blood Glucose TestingHypoglycemia unawareness is a complication of T1D where the patient misses the typical symptoms of a blood sugar drop (palpitations, sweating, anxiety, etc.). When their body does not release adrenaline there are no warning symptoms and then they are at risk for life threatening complications.

Online Interactive Resource – Hypoglycemia Education

We recently came across a new educational resource about hypoglycemia from the ‘Diabetes Sisters.’ This online resource includes basic information about hypoglycemia as well as video-based and interactive learning, infographics and more. Topics include “What Does Hypoglycemia Feel Like?” and “How to Talk to Your Doctor About Hypoglycemia.”

Each topic includes videos, quick tips and a quiz to test what you’ve learned. Visit the website to test your knowledge and share with family and friends so that they can be familiar with the signs of low blood sugar and help you if needed. It is important that people with diabetes know the risks of hypoglycemia as part of your diabetes management plan.

Additional Resources

Diabetes Sisters – visit this online community to read stories of how others deal with the real life challenges of diabetes.

411 on the CGM

American Diabetes Association – Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Glucose)


Upcoming Diabetes Educational Event – Taking Control of Your Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Diabetes Leave a comment   , , , , ,

Patient Education is one of our favorite topics here at Active Healthcare. We wanted to share the exciting news about an upcoming diabetes educational event coming to the Triangle area of North Carolina in a few months.

Taking Control of Your Diabetes (TCOYD) is a non-profit charitable educational organization that sponsors educational events in cities across the United States for people with diabetes, their families, and caregivers.

Taking Control of Your Diabetes“TCOYD educates, motivates, empowers and inspires people with diabetes — and family and friends who care about them — to take a more active role managing their diabetes, and being self-advocates. We do this by providing the best diabetes conferences & educational programs!”

Save the Date: TCOYD in Raleigh on Saturday May 11

This educational conference is for patients with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. The conference has sessions specifically designed for each group. Attendees can get the latest info on their disease and treatment options via keynote speakers and breakout sessions. Lunch is included in the $25 registration fee. Conference goers will also have the opportunity to ‘Ask a Specialist’ (Endocrinologists, Diabetes Educators, Dietitians, Nurses, and Pharmacists), visit the event’s health fair, meet with equipment vendors and also participate in a number of free health screenings.

The Triangle event will be held at the Raleigh Convention Center on Saturday, May 11th.

Full Raleigh Conference Schedule

For those of you outside of the Triangle Area, check out the TCOYD website for their full schedule of 2019 events. The conference will be in Charlotte NC area this fall on Saturday, November 2nd.

Additional Resources

Check out the TCOYD website for additional educational resources including videos and blog posts.

New Recommendations for Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes in Children and Adolescents

Diabetes Rates Among Children and Teens


Diabetes Rates Rise Among Children and Teens

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes Leave a comment   , ,

The New England Journal of Medicine recently reported that new cases of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are on the rise in youth. Estimates indicate that in the United States, 29.1 million people live with diabetes. About 208,000 of those are younger than 20. While Type 2 diabetes has a strong correlation with excess weight, type 1 diabetes is an auto immune condition.

The study’s goal was to reveal trends in newly diagnosed cases of diabetes within various ethnic groups. Research revealed that from 2002 to 2012 the rate of new cases of type 1 diabetes in youth went up approximately 1.8 percent each year. During the same time period, the rate of new cases of type 2 diabetes went up quicker, at 4.8 percent.

Diabetes Rates Rise: Other Findings in the Report:

  • Higher Type 1 Rates in Male Participants. Across all groups, the rate of new cases of type 1 diabetes increased more annually from 2003-2012 in males (2.2 percent) than in females (1.4 percent) ages 0-19.
  • Hispanic Youth Showed Largest Increase of Type 1. Among ages 0-19, the rate of new cases of type 1 diabetes increased most in Hispanic youth, a 4.2 percent annual increase.
  • Type 2 Rates Highest Amongst Native Americans. Among ages 10-19, the rate of new cases of type 2 diabetes rose most sharply in Native Americans (8.9 percent), Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders (8.5 percent) and non-Hispanic blacks (6.3 percent).
  • White Youth Showed Smallest Type 2 Increase. The smallest upturn was seen in whites (0.6 percent).
  • Higher Type 2 Rates in Female Participants. The rate of new cases of type 2 diabetes rose more sharply in females (6.2 percent) than in males (3.7 percent) ages 10-19.

Increased Health Care Burdens and Reduced Quality of Life

Living with diabetes from a young age sets up a longer lifetime of increased health care costs. It also creates potential for diabetes related complications. Efforts are underway by organizations like the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to find ways to prevent or delay youth from developing Type 2 diabetes, which has become more common in recent years.

Since the cause of Type 1 diabetes is still unknown, more work is needed to find out possible disease triggers that leave the body unable to produce adequate insulin. This study’s insights into the varying rates of diabetes by ethnic group may lead to new research directions.

Additional Resources:

New England Journal of Medicine Incidence Trends of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes among Youths, 2002-2012

CDC National Diabetes Prevention Program

Exercise and Blood Sugar Control for Kids with Diabetes


Exercise and Blood Sugar Control for Kids with Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes Leave a comment   , , , , , , , , , , , ,

There are many good reasons for anyone with diabetes to participate in a regular exercise program. But what are the important considerations about exercise and blood sugar control for kids with diabetes?

children-exercising-diabetes

Exercise can stabilize blood sugar levels and help maintain a healthy weight. Excess body fat prevents insulin from working to its full potential to control blood sugar. Another benefit of regular exercise is stress reduction and relaxation. Exercise is fun, especially when you are playing your favorite sport with your friends!

Preventing Low Blood Sugar – Hypoglycemia

Every diabetic knows the importance of planning in the successful management blood sugar. Regular blood sugar testing, or the use of a continuous glucose monitor, along with meal planning are all parts of comprehensive diabetes management plan. One consideration for active children, especially those participating in organized sports is the prevention of hypoglycemia.

Activities done for a long period of time, even at a moderate pace can cause the blood sugar levels to drop precipitously, even hours after the activity has ceased.

Keep coaches in the loop. They can assist with extra testing and have quick sugar snacks available, like fruit juices, hard candy, or honey. Coaches should know the signs of both low and high blood sugar, and keep handy instructions about what to do if either situation occurs.

Symptoms of Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia):Sweating, lightheadedness, shakiness, weakness, anxiety, hunger, headache, problems concentrating, and confusion

Symptoms of High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia):Frequent urination, fatigue, increased thirst, blurred vision, and headache

Hyperglycemia and Dehydration

When your muscles work hard they signal for the body to release extra glycogen from storage in the liver. If this excess glucose is not needed, and the amount of insulin doesn’t match the blood glucose, hyperglycemia (too much blood sugar) can result.

Shorter intense activities – like sprinting or weight lifting may actually cause a rise in blood sugar. The body sees the energy expenditure uptick and releases stored glycogen from the liver. If the activity level is not maintained, the body can’t use the excess sugar and blood sugar levels go up.

Unfortunately the body tries to remove the excess glucose through increase urination – which can contribute to dehydration. As with all athletes, children with diabetes need to stay well hydrated during any physical activity. The excitement of competition can produce extra adrenaline, which can also raise blood sugar.

Planning is the Key

Your healthcare provider may recommend a change to insulin dosing on the days when your child has practice or a game where there will be a higher level of physical activity. Tracking blood sugar levels before, during and after activity can give valuable information to your child’s healthcare provider to adjust dosing schedules.

Get to know how your child’s body reacts to different kinds of activity. To prevent the worry of blood sugar swings consider adding a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to your child’s diabetes management program. (link to 411 on CGM blog) A CGM will provide 24/7 updates on blood sugar levels and trending information.

A Lifetime of Fitness

Family Taking a WalkEveryone can appreciate the long-term benefits of fitness – improved functioning of your heart, lungs, and other vital body systems. Exercise enhances flexibility and increases muscle strength.

Even if your child does not play on a sports team you can still plan activities as a family to keep everyone moving. Ask your child to suggest activities for your family as they are much more likely to happily participate in activities that they already enjoy.

Additional Resources:

WebMD’s Safe Exercise Tip List for Children with Type 1 Diabetes

How to Exercise Safely with Type 1 Diabetes

The 411 on CGM


Insulin Pump vs. Multiple Injection: The Choice is Yours

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , ,

insulin pump versus multiple daily injectionsTreating diabetes can be a very time consuming, day-after-day process, but today’s diabetic has a plethora of different treatment options available — more than ever before.

Type 1 diabetics can choose between an insulin pump or administering multiple daily injections (MDI) for their insulin delivery. If you are not on a pump currently, you probably aren’t aware of just how helpful these devices can be.  Below are some advantages of both methods.

Advantages of an Insulin Pump

  • Insulin delivery is continuous, which helps prevent sudden highs and lows in blood sugar levels
  • Blood sugar control is more accurate
  • Patients need fewer needle sticks
  • Patients have more flexibility
  • Dosage can be adjusted easily according to the patient’s activity level: i.e. while exercising or sleeping

Advantages of Multiple Injections

  • Injections require less training and education
  • MDI is less expensive
  • Easier to use
  • Not always connected to the body

What Does Research Show? Insulin Pump Versus Multiple Daily Injections

Recent studies suggest that insulin pump therapy may be slightly more effective than MDI when the patients received similar, proper training.  However, both methods have been proven to reduce HbA1c levels.  An insulin pump can improve quality of life in diabetics and allow them to be a little more carefree than those that use the MDI method.  The bottom line is to find the method that fits best in your life while keeping your HbA1c levels in check.

Many of the patients of Active Healthcare are benefiting from pump therapy.  We work with manufacturers to get the right pump for our patients, as well as carry all of the necessary supplies.

Please visit our Diabetes Management page for more information on how we can help you, as well as talk to your doctor to see if they think a pump is the right method for you.


Can Diabetes Give You The Blues?

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , , ,

diabetes depressionThe number of Americans that suffer from depression, also known as Major Depressive Disorder is increasing all the time. Depression is more than being sad or in a bad mood. This condition is a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Unfortunately, depression often goes undiagnosed and, therefore, untreated. As it turns out, diabetics are especially vulnerable to this condition.

Diabetics At Double the Risk of Depression

Several studies have found that diabetics are at double the risk of suffering from depression due to the physical and emotional stress of their chronic disease. A depressed diabetic is more likely to neglect his/her diet or medication plan, which is critical to their well-being. The cause is unclear, however if a patient’s depression is stress induced, a diabetic may be a greater risk because of a metabolic imbalance that already exists.

Managing a chronic condition like diabetes can be overwhelming, leaving less time and energy for dealing with life’s other challenges. The financial burden of treating diabetes may also be a contributing factor to higher rates of depression. The rising medical costs of their life sustaining treatment adds another burden.

Studies also suggest that diabetics who have a history of depression are at a higher risk of developing diabetic complications than those without. This is because depressed individuals have elevated levels of stress hormones such as cortisol, which can affect blood sugar metabolism and increase insulin resistance.

What to Watch for: Symptoms of Depression

People suffering from depression may not want to get out of bed in the morning. They neglect their diet and don’t exercise. Depressed people shun social gatherings and have trouble staying motivated at work or school.

Seek help if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms:

• Difficulty concentrating, forgetfulness and poor decision making
• Feelings of guilt, worthlessness and/or helplessness
• Insomnia or excessive sleep
• Irritability or restlessness
• Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed
• Overeating or not eating enough (dangerous for diabetics)
• Aches and pains including headaches, cramps, and digestive problems
• Persistent sadness, anxiety, and feelings of emptiness
• Thoughts of suicide or attempting suicide

Depression can be brought on by a number of factors including genetics, life circumstances, trauma, side effects of medication, stress, or other environmental factors. It is treatable with psychotherapy, as well as medication. As with most medications, anti-depressants (often called SSRIs, which stands for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor) come with side effects including nausea, weight gain, fatigue, insomnia, dry mouth, dizziness, irritability, and anxiety.

You may have chalked your feelings of sadness up to the fact that you’re diabetic when you may also be depressed. Depression should be treated as a separate condition. Getting treatment for it can help you take better care of your diabetes, putting you in optimal health.

Additional Resources:

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/mental-health/depression.html

https://www.childrensdiabetesfoundation.org/diabetes-and-depression/


Diabetic Tips: Making Sure It’s “In the Bag”

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , ,

Emergency Diabetes BagAs a diabetic patient or parent, you are well aware that you need an emergency diabetes bag. This is one project that can’t be put off.

Advance planning is key to successful management of your diabetes. Don’t “live and learn,” coming up with a Plan B on the fly.

Here are some ideas for filling your emergency diabetes bag

Your Medical History and Contacts List

Take the necessary time to gather this information, which should include your health conditions, allergies, medications and dosages. Also, include contact information for your doctor, pharmacy, and emergency contact. Carry one in your wallet and smartphone.  Don’t forget to store a copy in an easy-to-locate area of your home, such as attached to the fridge.

Glucose tablets or gels are great to have in your bag in the event of a blood sugar nosedive.

But don’t forget a glucagon injection kit, you may need this depending on the severity of your episode. On that note, it would also be a good idea to keep a list of signs and symptoms at work and home so others can identify these and know how to assist.

Extra Medications – Include three days’ worth of your medications.

When you are ready to head out, keep your insulin cold with reusable frozen gel packs.

Snacks to keep blood sugar stable.

Always have some non-perishable snacks such as nuts, seeds, dried fruit, whole-grain crackers, trail mix, or dry cereal on hand.

Testing Supplies – so you can test as many times as you need to.

Being out and about can raise your stress level, causing your blood sugar to fluctuate more than usual. Therefore, it may be necessary to test a little more frequently.

Include the following:

  • Meter
  • Test Strips
  • Batteries
  • Lancing Device
  • Lancets
  • Needles
  • Alcohol Swabs
  • Hand Sanitizer

Let a Medical Alert Bracelet Speak For You When You Can’t

Always remember to wear a Diabetes ID bracelet. In the event you lose consciousness or cannot speak, bystanders and first responders will know that you are diabetic and can help accordingly. This bracelet should clearly state your diagnosis and any other key health information. You can find these at the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) website at www.shopdiabetes.org.

Advanced Planning is the Key to Peace of Mind

Once you have your emergency bag packed, you can relax while on-the-go. For additional peace of mind, consider using a Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) system or an insulin pump if you are not already benefiting from one of these devices.

More information about how CGM works can be found in our previous blog The 411 on CGM.


The Lowdown on Stress and Diabetes

Lisa Feierstein Children's Health, Diabetes, Men's Health, Women's Health Leave a comment   , , , ,

sleep deprived manIf you have diabetes, stress can take a larger toll on your body.  When the body is under stress, it acts as if it is under attack.  Cortisol (the stress hormone) levels rise, causing your body to store energy in the form of glucose and fat.  In diabetics, this process can be disrupted.  The glucose is released, and if it can’t be stored, it builds up in your bloodstream.

Stress hormones are scientifically proven to affect blood glucose levels.  Scientists who have been studying the effects of stress on these levels have found that when diabetic mice were under stress they had elevated glucose levels.  In Type 1 diabetics, studies produced mixed results with some patients experiencing a rise in blood glucose while others noticed a decline.  Type 2 diabetics more consistently experienced a rise than a decline.  This research confirms the importance of stress reduction.

Not All Coping Mechanisms Are Good

Everyone has different ways of coping with stress on the outside.  Some negative examples are below:

  • Drinking more alcohol
  • Not getting enough exercise
  • Neglecting nutrition (very important NOT to do if you’re diabetic)
  • Not getting adequate sleep

 

Diabetics have even more to think about during stressful times and stress may cause them to forget important tasks such as checking their blood glucose levels on a regular basis or planning their meals ahead of time.

Positive Coping Mechanisms

On the other hand, there are many positive ways to deal with stress.  Below are some methods anyone can implement to reduce stress:

  • Get regular exercise
  • Spend more time on your hobbies or learn a new one
  • Perform volunteer work in your community
  • When commuting, take the less stressful route to work if your drive is long
  • Patch up conflicts with your friends or family

 

Relaxation Therapy Techniques for Stress Reduction

  • Breathing exercises
  • Replace negative thoughts with positive ones
  • Progressive muscle relaxation therapy — an example of this is shown in the video below

 


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